Christmas on the Black Meadow – a seasonal mix from Melmoth the Wanderer

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The fourth seasonal mix from Melmoth_the_Wanderer recalls his visit to The Black Meadow – a place steeped in wyrd folklore and mysterious happenings. This mix contains reading by Chris Lambert from his book  `Christmas on the Black Meadow’. 

The music comes from the two albums also associated with The Black Meadow – The Soulless Party’s `Tales from the Black Meadow’ and the compilation album inspired by Chris’ original book (of the same name) made up of tracks by artists from around the world – Songs from the Black Meadow.

Both of these albums are available for purchase.

Do you see shadows in the mist? Are you stalked by meadow hags? Do you long to play with black stars? Do you crave a darker yule?

Then this book could be for you!

It is Christmas on the North York Moors.
The snow sits upon the heather and bramble. The fences around RAF Fylingdales are silent and still. A dense mist grows in the distance. If you listen closely you can hear strange Yuletide chants, the hum of a land sphere and the cackle of a meadow hag.
This collection of Christmas tales from the Black Meadow contains three new Yuletide stories. Experience a beautiful inversion of The Nativity in A Black Meadow Christmas, warm
 your toes in a tale of matriarchal terror in The Meadow Tree and marvel at the delightful wonders of The Black Star. You will also find details of ideal gifts you could give and games that you can play when visiting the Black Meadow.
With beautiful illustrations by Andy Paciorek and Nigel Wilson, this is a festive treat that will bring joy and fear in equal measure to your Christmas celebrations.
All profits from the sale of this book go to Worldwide Cancer Research.

Discover more by visiting http://blackmeadowtales.blogspot.co.uk/ where you will be able to join the legions of enthusiasts already immersing themselves in the tales from the Black Meadow.

https://beta.mixcloud.com/Melmoth_The_Wanderer/christmas-on-the-black-meadow/

Christmas on the Black Meadow

A perfect Christmas gift to satisfy all of your Folk Horror Christmas cravings…

Do you see shadows in the mist? Are you stalked by meadow hags? Do you long to play with black stars? Do you crave a darker yule? Then this book could be for you!

It is Christmas on the North York Moors.

The snow sits upon the heather and bramble. The fences around RAF Fylingdales are silent and still. A dense mist grows in the distance. If you listen closely you can hear strange Yuletide chants, the hum of a land sphere and the cackle of a meadow hag.

This collection of Christmas tales from the Black Meadow contains three new Yuletide stories. Experience a beautiful inversion of The Nativity in A Black Meadow Christmas, warm your toes in a tale of matriarchal terror in The Meadow Tree and marvel at the delightful wonders of The Black Star. You will also find details of ideal gifts you could give and games that you can play when visiting the Black Meadow.

With beautiful illustrations by Andy Paciorek and Nigel Wilson, this is a festive treat that will bring joy and fear in equal measure to your Christmas celebrations.

All profits from the sale of this book go to Worldwide Cancer Research.

Click here to buy!

Folk Horror Revival at the British Museum – SOLD OUT

The Folk Horror Revival: Otherworldly event at the British Museum, London on 16th October 2016 – has now Sold Out.

Thank You Very Much to everybody who bought a ticket – Enjoy 🙂

The event will feature –

Gary Lachman

Iain Sinclair

Bob Beagrie  ~ Leagunspell

Michael Somerset & The Consumptives

Eamon Byers

Adam Scovell

Gary Parsons

Yvonne Salmon

Andy Paciorek

James Riley 

 Darren Charles

Lee Gerrard-Butler

+ Very special Guests

Your compere for the day (if the Black Meadow mist allows him to escape) is Chris Lambert.

The event has been brought together by the hard work and  tireless efforts of Jim Peters with help from the FHR administration cabal.
Thanks everyone 🙂

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Third Reveal)

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The first Folk Horror Revival event will be taking place at the British Museum, London on  October 16th 2016, featuring talks, lectures, short films, poetry readings, museum tours and other wyrd and intriguing happenings.

Cult television programmes and films of the 1960s and 70s are inspiring a new generation of poets, writers, artists and musicians with their atmospheric themes of contemporary individuals interacting with a uniquely British world of ancient mythology and magic, often uncanny and unsettling.

This special event will feature lectures, film screenings, performances and gallery tours of featured objects in the Museum’s collection to explore themes of cultural rituals, earth mysteries, psychogeography and folklore. Come along and prepare to be scared!

Ticket details to be announced very shortly.

We are proud to reveal other additions to the line up – see also

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (First Reveal)

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Second Reveal)

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We have already announced filmmaker Adam Scovell as one of the wonderful guest speakers at the FHR event on 16th October so now it is time to reveal our second filmmaker to be screening and speaking about his work – Gary Parsons

Gary is an MA film graduate from Goldsmiths College London who specialises in short films. Utilizing both, elements of the surrealist genre and images of the occult, these films are both beautiful and at times disturbing.

We are very excited that Gary has chosen the event at the British Museum to premier his latest film – ‘Conjuration’. It is a film about magick being a neutral energy and it’s residue from ancient times that is there for people to draw on and includes a re-enactment of an Alex Sanders ritual.

thelemafilms.com

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Revealing the Master of Ceremonies.

To make sure the day proceeds as has been planned by the FHR cabal Chris Lambert will be taking on the role of Master of Puppets for the day – introducing each speaker as well as welcoming you all to the event and summing up at the end of the day. Please allow me to introduce Chris Lambert – Storyteller – Teacher – Traveller of Mist – Mythogeographer – Demiurge – Liar

Chris is the curator of the Black Meadow and its associated phenomena. He works closely with Kev Oyston as part of “The Soulless Party” to uncover the mysteries hidden within its dense mist.
He writes far too much. As well as the critically lauded Tales from the Black Meadow and Songs from the Black Meadow he has also had short stories published in The Ghastling, The Dead Files and Tales of the Damned. He has had four plays published and over 20 performed professionally including: The Simple Process of Alchemy, Loving Chopin and Ship of Fools. He occasionally dabbles with music too.
He is currently working with Folk Horror emperor Andy Paciorek on a new collection of short stories entitled Wyrd Kalendar and Christmas on the Black Meadow.
Starburst Magazine has this to say about Tales from the Black Meadow: “The stand out entries include “Beyond the Moor” a poem about a maiden accosted by a bandit who remains unafraid due to having been to the “beyond” of the title and returned. Also of note are “Children of the Black Meadow” where a bereaved mother resurrects her deceased kids as blackberry bramble homunculi; cyclical damnation tale “The Coal Man and the Creature” and the paranoia-inducing sucker punch “The Watcher From the Village” … this is a collection that strongly invites a second reading…”

blackmeadowtales.blogspot.co.uk

More speakers and ticket details to be revealed soon. Follow us on Facebook

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Tales of the Damned

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Edited by and featuring the work of cryptozoologist and folklore author Richard Freeman, Tales of the Damned : An Anthology of Fortean Horror is a chilling compendium of short stories by numerous luminary writers including Andy Roberts, Karl Shuker, Lars Thomas and numerous other talented souls – including and forgive us for blowing our own trumpets  😉
no less than three administrators of Folk Horror Revival the authors Andrew McGuigan (Cumbrian Cthulhu), Chris Lambert (Tales from the Black Meadow) and Andy Paciorek (Strange Lands: A Field Guide to the Celtic Otherworld)

“Here we have a book unique in the annals of horror literature. This is a book where the stories are penned, mostly, by fortean researchers. For those who are unfamiliar with the term, ‘fortean’ refers to the works of Charles Hoy Fort (August 6, 1874 – May 3, 1932). Fort was an American writer and researcher into strange phenomena. Fort collected newspaper reports of sightings of strange creatures, weird light phenomena, falls of fish and other creatures, and poltergeist outbreaks to name but a few. Fort realized that mainstream science was acting somewhat like a fundamentalist religion and that any anomalous data that did not fit into the current scientific paradigm was simply swept under the carpet. Fort called this ‘damned data’. He published his findings in four books: The Book of the Damned (1919), New Lands (1923), Lo! (1932) and Wild Talents (1932), all of which are still in print today. Fort has influenced modern research with magazines like Fortean Times, which has been recording weird happenings since 1973, and the Centre for Fortean Zoology, the world’s only full time mystery animal investigation organization. The publishing wing of the latter is responsible for this book.”

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The Mysteries of the Black Meadow

Tales from the Black Meadow is a multi-media folk horror project. It mixes folk stories, song, music, documentary, film, illustration, web sites, physical artefacts and much more. The book Tales from the Black Meadow explores the mysteries surrounding the Black Meadow on the North York Moors. A place of inexplicable occurrences, strange traditions and disappearances. It is accompanied by a CD of the same name by “The Soulless Party” which contains music to be listened to alongside the tales as well as a lost Radio 4 documentary “Curse of the Black Meadow”.

The Black Meadow is a dangerous and beautiful world. It is best avoided, especially if the mist rises…

“Can you tell me, maiden fair
Can you tell me if or where
I shall see my child again
Walk upon the fields of men?
Will she ever stumble back
From the meadow all a’black?”

Collected by Sir Stanley Coulton, this is just one example of the rich folklore that permeates throughout Black Meadow. Located on the North York Moors this is a place of strange phenomena, bizarre traditions, disappearances and folklore. It is a place in which you could find yourself lost in time, engulfed by mist, at the whim of a Meadow Hag or transformed into a horseman. Be wary. This is all utterly true. Every word of it.

It must be true. The evidence is all around us. For there are artefacts, such as this letter from Lord Brightwater that was discovered recently by the Brightwater Archive, a collective who have been trawling through the recently opened files on the Black Meadow Phenomena. They have unearthed some key pieces of evidence that make us look at what is just dismissed as simple folk tales in a whole new light. Everybody knows the sad tale of what happened to Lord Brightwater so I won’t go into it here – if you need a reminder then do visit the Brightwater Archive. (https://brightwaterarchive.wordpress.com/)

This telegram reveals even more. A recent telegram taken from the archive reveals the strain and possible danger that the Brightwater team faced on a daily basis. It frustratingly opens up further questions rather than answers.
Who are the family to whom this refers?
What are the “spheres”?
Why do they need 15 more workers and spades?
What is the surveying equipment for?
Note the reference to the “mist rising”. Is this code? Surely a mist is so inconsequential as to not need mentioning in a telegram.
And for a member of this scientific team to ask for prayer, a team lead by outspoken atheist Lord Brightwater is strange indeed.
The key question for those searching through the archive is to find the identities of members of Brightwater’s team. Who wrote this? What was happening on the 10th December 1931?

Roger Mullins disappeared into the mist in 1972. It was the tales of disappearances that drew him there. Investigated by Lord Brightwater in the 1930s and then (after the government shut that investigation down) explored by Mullins through the 1960s the Black Meadow revealed further secrets rather than answers. The all-pervading mist covering everything and creating more mystery within.

This just gives a tiny glimpse into this fascinating world. To find out more click here: http://blackmeadowtales.blogspot.co.uk/

Where is Black Meadow?
The area known as “Black Meadow” is located on the North York Moors just off the Whiteway Heads Road in a site fenced off by the Ministry of Defence.
For those interested Walk 1602 from “Walking Britain” would take you very close to this site. (http://www.walkingbritain.co.uk/walk-1602-description)
You will need to be very careful though. Make sure that you inform someone where you are going, take a mobile phone and stay out of the mist.

Where can I find out more?
You can visit the website:
(http://blackmeadowtales.blogspot.co.uk/)
You can buy the book:
(https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tales-Black-Meadow-Chris-Lambert/dp/148417173X)
You can listen to and buy the album:
(https://thesoullessparty.bandcamp.com/album/tales-from-the-black-meadow)
You can buy the charity album inspired by the book. It contains songs by Folk Horror artists and all proceeds go to cancer research.
(http://www.mega-dodo.co.uk/products/songs-from-the-black-meadow)

This article uses elements of the introduction from a paper Chris Lambert presented at The Alchemical Landscape, Cambridge University

Copyright © Chris Lambert 2016