Mabon ’17: FHR Book Charity Donation

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🍂 Hail Ghostwood and Mabon 🍂

To mark the Autumn Equinox, Folk Horror Revival has again made a seasonal charitable donation of all profits from Wyrd Harvest Press books to a Wildlife Trusts nature conservation project. The winner of the poll as voted for by group members this time was Shropshire Wildlife Trust’s Pine Marten Project.
Happily we have handed over £280.83 to this worthy cause.

Thank You to everyone who voted and especially to those who bought or contributed their time and work freely to our books 🙂

🍂Happy Mabon 🍂

Books still available, more titles to follow in near future –

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/andypaciorek
Read about & donate directly to appeals –

http://www.wildlifetrusts.org/appeals
Thank You ☼

autumn 2017

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Awakening the Fields …

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FOLK HORROR REVIVAL Proudly Presents
֍ AWAKENING THE FIELDS ֍
An afternoon of talks and live music featuring ~
SHARRON KRAUS
THE CONSUMPTIVES featuring THE MOTHER OF CROWS

CHRISTOPHER JOSIFFE + CHRIS HILL ~ Gef the Talking Mongoose
ANDY ROBERTS ~ Alan Garner’s Thursbitch
JUSTIN HOPPER ~ the Old Weird Albion
HANNAH GILBERT ~ Old Gods’ Own Country
DARREN CHARLES + ANDY PACIOREK ~ An Introduction to Folk Horror

Compere – BOB FISCHER

All for the princely sum of 5 English pounds 🙂
Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield.
Saturday October 28th 2017 12 -4.30pm

Tickets availble now from –

http://www.hepworthwakefield.org/whatson/folk-horror-revival-awakening-the-fields/

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FHR Edinburgh: The Final Reveal

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To complete the great line-up at The Unseelie Court event at Edinburgh Summerhall, Folk Horror Revival are very proud to present ~

Headling our night of music are PYE CORNER AUDIO.
Pye Corner Audio is a British electronic music project by Martin Jenkins. Originally self-released, Vols 1 – 2 and Vols 3 – 4 of the Black Mill Tapes were released by Type records as TYPE107 and TYPE118. Sleep Games was released on Ghost Box.

Submerged rhythms and ectoplasmic electronics haunt the disused dance halls and concrete derelicts of Belbury.
It’s possible to detect echoes of John Carpenter, Italo-horror soundtracks and a kind of post rave meltdown in Martin Jenkins’ submerged disco and spectral electronics.

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Completing our catalogue of talks at the day event is Murdo Eason of The Fife Psychogeographical Collective, who will be talking on Embedded in the Landscape: Psychogeography, Folk Horror and the Everyday.
https://fifepsychogeography.com/

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Intoducing the event are Folk Horror Revival’s own Darren Charles and Andy Paciorek who have previously brought their take on the folk horror phenomenon to the stages of Cambridge University and The British Museum

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Author extraodinaire Chris Lambert will be our MC for the day, and will be launching The Wyrd Calendar. Maybe there will be some tales of The Black Meadow.
http://blackmeadowtales.blogspot.co.uk/

folk horror revival @ British Museum

See Also –
FHR- Edinburgh Event – First Reveal
FHR- Edinburgh Event – Second Reveal

FHR Edinburgh Event – Third Reveal

FHR Edinburgh Event – Fourth Reveal

Tickets available now from here

 

BM photos by Graeme Cunningham

The Wyrd Kalendar – The September Mix

It is September.

Summer is drawing to its end.

The nights are closing in.

Leaves are on the turn and primed to fall.

Joyously run through the fallen leaves on the Kalendar Heath this month with Nick Drake, Dinah Washington, Simon and Garfunkel, David Cain, Captain Beefheart, Justin Hayward, Lou Reed, Earth, Wind and Fire, Jez Butler, David Whitfield, Fiona Apple, New Model Army, Monty Python, Carole King, Tindersticks, Edith Piaf, The Flaming Lips, The Waterboys, David Sylvian, The White Stripes and John Martyn. You will hear extracts from “Ashley and Ashley” the September story from “Wyrd Kalendar” due to be published in October this year by Wyrd Harvest Press.

The Wyrd Kalendar – The August Mix

The Kalendar Heath is ready to be explored this August, but beware, the willows are on the move.

Celebrate Lammas with the likes of Magnet, The Owl Service, Beacon Street Union, Bebel Gilberto, The Tiger Lilies, Love, Clinic, Carole King, Funkadelic, Hall and Oates, Grizzly Bear, Kingston Trio, Micky Newbury, Jacco Gardner, Julie London, David Cain, Lost Trail, The The and Isla Cameron.

This month’s exploration of the Kalendar Heath includes extracts from this month’s short story "The Weeping Will Walk" written and performed by Chris Lambert. The story will be published as part of "Wyrd Kalendar" a collection of 12 short stories written by Chris Lambert and illustrated by Andy Paciorek to be published in October 2017.

Deconstructing The Wicker Man: Friday 28th July, Glasgow

Join folklore and film experts for a screening and discussion of the influence and impact of this 1973 cult horror classic.

Since the film’s release in 1973, The Wicker Man has grown into something of a cult classic. Join folklore and film experts Dr Lizanne Henderson and Dr Jonny Murray for a pre film screening discussion. Dr Lizanne Henderson, University of Glasgow, is an expert in Scottish history and folk belief, author of ’Witchcraft and Folk Belief in the Age of Enlightenment’ (Winner of the Katharine Briggs Book Award 2016). Dr Jonny Murray, Edinburgh College of Art. In 2005 he edited “Constructing the Wicker Man”, a collection of 11 essays based on papers presented at the first academic conference dedicated to the film.

Fri 28 Jul 2017
7.00PM – 10.00PM
City Halls – Recital Room

Adult £6, Concession £5

Click here for booking details.

Review: Spirits Of Place

‘Spirits of Place’ is an anthology journeying into the minds, places and memories of spirits-of-place-kindle-covertwelve writers as they attempt to put into words the emotional and cultural residue implied by a location dear to them. It’s not merely the hard geography of a location but its evolution though folk history which is of interest here. This isn’t another book of psychogeography essays where the landscape is explored and meaning extrapolated from the usual tired rambles of London and Paris, ‘Spirits of Place’ puts a human face onto local mythology and shows that the devil (and assorted other spirits) is almost certainly in the detail as it’s often the little stories that provide the biggest connections to a place. In all cases careful research goes hand in hand with the writer’s emotions and experiences providing the reader with more than enough information to spark further investigation.

This project, derived from a day of lectures in Liverpool in 2016, has been carefully curated by John Reppion to include a refreshing diversity of writers with the essays contained covering a lot of ground both physically and metaphorically. From Bryndís Björgvinsdóttir’s background in Icelandic Elf-lore and how its interfering with modern road and building construction, to Vajra Chandrasekera’s personal account how Sri Lankan spirit folklore evolves to retain its relevance in a rapidly changing socio-political landscape, to Maria J. Perez Cuervo’s piece on the moving of King Philip II of Spain’s Spanish Capital to a mountain local myth says contains the caves that the Devil lived in after his fall from Heaven, the span is ambitiously global telling very human tales which derive (as all things do) from the land.

Of the writers included, the three most known to me, Warren Ellis, Iain Sinclair and Alan Moore don’t disappoint in their submissions. In ‘A Compendium of Tides’ Ellis paints a vivid picture of strange frequencies plucked throughout time from the aether of the Thames Estuary, with the wreck of the SS Richard Montgomery and its dangerously deteriorating stockpile of wartime bombs hanging, like a Damoclean sword, threatening turn the area and its history back into atoms and background static. Sinclair leaves behind his beloved London to travel to Palermo, weaving an almost a film noir narrative about his visit to the Capuchin Catacombs, with the journey full of stories that lead him on a deep meditation into its place in the Sicilian psyche. And, having been fortunate enough to see Moore perform the piece his essay ‘Coal Dreams’ was based on at the Sage in Gateshead back in 2010, it’s great to see it finally documented as his contribution. First leading the reader through his own previous personal involvement with Newcastle and the mental and physical journey it has taken to get him there, then setting about re-imagining Newcastle and its environment by reframing its history using it’s pre Christian backdrop in an enthralling riposte to J B Priestley’s damning of Newcastle in ‘English Journey’, invoking Antenociticus (a Roman flavoured variant of Caernunnos) in his temple in Wallsend by way of brimstone-fired visions of the painter John Martin, Mary Shelly and Bovril.

None of the essays in this tight packed anthology overstay their welcome and the high level of writing prowess across the book makes it a joy to read, even if you manage to find an essay topic which doesn’t immediately float your boat. The general tone and connection to the theme does remain even throughout which goes to show that no matter where you are, if you concentrate on any place long enough, you can start to see the ghosts infused within the brickwork and the angels in the architecture. This book fits wonderfully into the growing movement towards the re-enchantment of location and will be of great interest to those fostering a deeper connection with the landscape.

Spirits of Place is published by Daily Grail Publishing
For more details, visit www.spiritsofplace.com

Review by S.: of the Psychogeographical Commission.

 

 

 

 

Review: this is not a picture

this is not a picture by Howard David Ingham

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this is not a picture is a collection of eight short ghost stories, by Howard Ingham of these here parts, probably best known to revivalists for his excellent series of film reviews, We Don’t Go Back. The tales here are linked by pieces of art – a photograph, a TV play, a song – each of which is central to the plot.

Of the stories here, the one that stands out as being of most interest to folk horror fans is “The Austringer (1969)”, which revolves around a lost BBC play, bringing to mind the once seen and now half-remembered, haunting quality the likes of Penda’s Fen and Robin Redbreast had before being made accessible again by BFI re-releases. The tale cuts back and forth between the unscrupulous collector who unearths a copy from a deceased acquaintance’s collection and the play itself, with the two inevitably meeting. The excerpts from the TV play are particularly spot on, evoking the atmosphere of the supernatural plays of the era.

My personal favourite is “An envelope”, where a man grieving for his disappeared girlfriend comes into possession of an envelope full of polaroids depicting horrifying scenes, seemingly from a parallel reality where something has gone very wrong. Each photograph is described in detail, sketching a horrific world, leaving you to fill in the details with your worst nightmares. It’s made all the weirder by the fact that it was written in the author’s sleep, like he unconsciously tapped into some horrendous parallel world. More speculative horror than folk horror perhaps, but deeply unsettling.

The striking thing about this collection is its humanity, the way the characters relate to each other and the world around them, indeed one of the tales – “So I caught up with Dennis” – derives much of its uneasiness from a changed relationship between two old friends. No matter how weird the situation is, the characters and their actions always remain believable.

A thoroughly engaging collection of tales. You can pick up a copy here.

Review by Scott Lyall