Spring Solstice: Book Sales Donation 2018

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Happy Spring Equinox !!

To mark the season, Folk Horror Revival / Wyrd Harvest Press are again donating profits from our book sales to a Wildlife Trusts project.

This time Wiltshire Wildlife Trusts Marvellous Meadows project has been voted the lucky recipient by members of our Facebook Group and receive  £501.32

spring 18

spring 18 poll

Our previous donations have been as follows –

total 15 to 17

Should you require further information of the donations email – folkhorrorrevival@gmail.com and / or contact The Wildlife Trusts

To make a donation directly to The Wildlife Trusts

To buy our books – http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/andypaciorek

Thank You to all those who voted and especially to those who bought our books – Enjoy.


Return to the Fields …


The Second Edition of Folk Horror Revival: Field Studies is now available from here

A new and revised edition of the seminal tome Folk Horror Revival: Field Studies. A collection of essays, interviews and artwork by a host of talents exploring the weird fields of folk horror, urban wyrd and other strange edges. Contributors include Robin Hardy, Ronald Hutton, Alan Lee, Philip Pullman, Thomas Ligotti, Kim Newman, Adam Scovell, Gary Lachman, Susan Cooper and a whole host of other intriguing and vastly talented souls. An indispensable companion for all explorers of the strange cinematic, televisual, literary and folkloric realms. This edition contains numerous extra interviews and essays as well as updating some information and presented with improved design. 100% of all sales profits of this book are charitably donated at quarterly intervals to The Wildlife Trusts.

Paperback – 550 pages – Normal retail price -£15.00 + Shipping

Special Launch Offer – 20% off normal price*
A further 10% Discount + Free Shipping **
Use Code BOOKSHIP18 at checkout

* Offer available on Field Studies only. No Code needed.  Offer ends 11.59pm – 19th March 2018. UK time
** Offer available on all Wyrd Harvest Press books. Use code BOOKSHOP18. Offer ends 11.59pm 19th March 2018 – local time

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Welcome to The Shivering Circle

Howard David Ingham

Tabletop role-playing games have been, much like folk horror, undergoing something of a renaissance in the last few years – Dungeons and Dragons, the grandfather of them all, sold more copies in 2017 than ever before – and that’s spilled over into all sorts of niche games, which address all sorts of genres. Games like Fiasco and Apocalypse World and its offshoots (which include Monsterhearts, and Dungeon World) have huge followings now, driven by vibrant online communities. But with this exciting growth in the scop of RPGs, I never really felt anyone had yet made a satisfactory folk horror game. I’ve been designing RPGs professionally for over a decade now and I’ve had work appear in about 50 RPG books for various published. A couple of years ago, I created Chariot, a complex and very personal game set in an occultist’s Atlantis, with a system driven by Tarot cards. I learnt a lot from that game, and with my folk horror obsession in full swing, I recently started to think hard about what a folk-horror RPG would look like.

So I wrote The Shivering Circle.

I wanted to create a game with a sort of home-made feeling to it, where you play ordinary people with ordinary desires and fears, but which also had a sense of grim inevitability (after all, like poor Neil Howie, or Jay the Hitman, it was you they wanted all along). In The Shivering Circle, named for a stone monument that has the peculiar effect of making you feel very cold if you’re standing in the middle of it, we briefly visit the Hoddesham Down and the nearby communities of Hoddesford and Hoddeston. Here, the (illegal) local hunt meet finds other animals to pursue, a shaggy, shadowy figure whispers terrible ideas to the downtrodden kids on the local estate, a craggy-faced rural austringer has lived in the same shed for 200 years, and you can visit the Charity Shop of the Damned. I wanted to sketch a place you could visit, that felt real, and to bring out the way in which folk horror juxtaposes the prosaic and the uncanny, and perhaps attempt to infuse it with the cynical humour of Nigel Kneale, Ben Wheatley and The League of Gentlemen. The Hoddesham Down has its share of ghosts, but then everywhere in Britain does – we live on an island where there are no untrodden places, only abandoned ones.These ghosts are as commonplace as the cup of tea on the table by the armchair where sits the corpse.

In The Shivering Circle, you’ll find a filmography, with many of the usual suspects on it, and a section of the text – the meat of the rules text – licensed under a Creative Common Attribution Licence, meaning that anyone who wants to publish their own, compatible game using the same rules, they’re welcome to. I did that because I’d love to see other writers in the community produce games set in other folk horror settings – perhaps in American or Australian, or European, or Asian settings.

The Shivering Circle is available in digital format (and soon in print) at drivethrurpg.com/product/237130/The-Shivering-Circle

Howard Ingham blogs regularly at Room207Press.com



John Pilgrim and Folk Horror Revival proudly present ‘Swansongs’, an evening of haunting music at the Black Swan Inn, York featuring Sharron Krauss, Hawthonn and Sarah Dean.


Sharron Kraus is a singer of folk songs, a songwriter and multi-instrumentalist whose solo work and collaborations offer a dark and subversive take on traditional music. As well as drawing on the folk traditions of England and Appalachia, her music is influenced by gothic literature, surrealism, myth and magick. Her songs tell intricate tales of rootless souls, dark secrets and earthly joys, the lyrics plucked as sonorously as her acoustic guitar.

She has released six solo albums, the first of which, ‘Beautiful Twisted’, was named by Rolling Stone in their Critics’ Top Albums of 2002. As well as her solo work, Sharron has recorded an album of traditional songs – ‘Leaves From Off The Tree’ – with Meg Baird and Helena Espvall of Espers, written an album of songs to celebrate the seasons of the year – ‘Right Wantonly A-Mumming’ – which was recorded with some of England’s finest traditional folk singers including Jon Boden, Fay Hield and Ian Giles – as well as recording and performing as a duo – Rusalnaia – with Ex Reverie’s Gillian Chadwick, with Tara Burke (Fursaxa) as Tau Emerald and with Irish free-folk collective United Bible Studies.



Hawthonn  are Mugwort-smoking suburban witches. Sinister wailing from abandoned cooling towers. New observatories for atomic occultism. Synth-haloed chanting from the caverns of the blood moon. Gnostic pentagrams and underground spectralism.

Nice me and harp

Sarah Dean aka The Incredible String Blonde, has been writing her own music and ‘noodling’ for years on various instruments, but only since 2007 has Sarah finally pulled all the years of performance as a singer and hours of practice together, to go solo and write and perform her own songs. 
It is the Celtic Harp that allows Sarah to create rich textures and atmospheres to the words and meaning of a song, taking listeners to another place with its magical and mesmeric soundscapes.   Peppered amongst her own self-penned songs are some surprising contemporary covers (the bluesy Man In The Long Black Coat, Pink Floyds’ atmospheric Grantchester Meadows, Walking On The Moon by The Police etc) and beautifully arranged traditional folk songs.  20 years of performing have given Sarah a relaxed and easy stage presence and audiences are treated to amusing anecdotes.


Dating from the 15th century, The Black Swan Inn is a half-timbered pub with rooms is a block from the River Foss, a 10 minute walk from York Castle and a 5-10 minute walk from Jorvik Viking Centre.

Its traditional rooms all include en suite bathrooms and antique, 4-poster beds with rich draperies. Parking and breakfast are complimentary.

They boast a wood panelled restaurant with coffered ceilings and an open fireplace where we serve food daily, and two beer gardens where you can relax with a drink when the sun comes out.

Within this early 15th century merchant’s mansion various ghostly sightings have occurred.

There is a ghost of the gentleman in a bowler hat who appears to be impatiently waiting for someone at the bar – eventually his apparition slowly fades away.

Another ghost can be seen sitting staring into the fire in the bar. It is the ghost of a particularly beautiful young woman thought to be a jilted bride. It is said that should a man stare into her face he will die in ecstasy.

There are several other ghosts who appear regularly. A small boy, known affectionately to the staff as Matthew, is frequently seen in the bar and passageway. He is dressed in Victorian style clothes and is reportedly a pickpocket, which might explain the disappearance of various items kept behind the bar.

A rumoured highwayman, who we know as Jack, appears regularly in the kitchen, dressed in riding boots and a long black cloak. Interestingly, the kitchen was built over the original stable yard. He can also be heard singing along to Irish folk songs in the corner of the bar late at night.

A less frequent ghostly visitor is a large black cat wandering around the pub. This ghost causes confusion among staff and frequent customers alike as it bears a strong resemblance to Salem, the pubs resident feline.

The chair by the fire is reputedly cursed and it is said that should anyone sit in it a curse will fall upon them. We recommend standing.

There have been regular sightings of a pair of legs disappearing up the stairs leading to the landlord’s flat. We believe the landlord may have to be legless himself to dare to sleep there!

In the main bar area there is a clay pipe mounted on the wall. This pipe was found during restoration work. It is said that the workmen threw it out and at that very moment a chill descended upon them. There was a moment of frozen fear until one of them went to retrieve the pipe, after which the chill lifted. The pipe will always remain in the pub for fear of high electricity bills.

The Black Swan Inn – 23 Peasholme Green, York YO1 7PR

Tickets for Swansongs are available now £10 + small booking fee from –
Event is likely to sell out so please book soon to avoid disappointment.



Lookee yonder ~ Wyrd Harvest Press 2018


2018 is already again a busy year for both Folk Horror Revival and Wyrd Harvest Press.
Lined up are talks at others’ events or media presences and again a fruitful focus of books.

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Our first venture into publishing back in the winter of 2015, Folk Horror Revival: Field Studies was very much a cutting of teeth. Using multi-contributors from many a field close and far for inclusion in a charity book and testing out unfamiliar Print on Demand demands led it is safe to say a headache or ten … But we were left in our hands, somehow put together by a new and relatively unexperienced quantity a tome that featured amongst its pages , contributions by the likes of Philip Pullman, Robin Hardy, Alan Lee and also a cornucopia of interviews with or essays by a surge of new talent. Field Studies, I think it is fair to say, opened more eyes to the genre of folk horror and its revival. Furthermore, though its creators have not made a penny from it; conservation and biodiversity projects conducted by The Wildlife Trusts have benefited well from its presence.
It was not a perfect book however, as some reviewers fairly pointed out, there were some formatting issues which gave an uneven appearance. A minor complaint, but one we took note of …..sooooooo …. this year sees a Second Edition of Field Studies, which not only sees the design improved but also features numerous new interviews and essays featuring the talents for instance of Susan Cooper, Pat Mills and Ronald Hutton and themes such as cults in cinema, communications with the dead and the wolf in the rye, amongst others.
The original Field Studies is no longer available to buy from our book-store but a new, bigger and better version is coming soon.

It will be followed by Harvest Hymns (a 2 volume extravaganza released simultaneously). Pieced together by the mysterious music-magician Melmoth the Wanderer, prepare to be treated to the sumptious tastes of the twisted roots and sweetest fruits of Folk Horror music. Delving first via essays and interviews, into a paganistic past of folk music, experimental electronics and witchy metal we are brought into the present of dark folk, drone and many other strange and wondrous aural delights.
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Also this year, we will bring to you a collection of contemporary ghost stories gathered by the author Paul Guernsey from a pool of talented haunted souls, whose nightmares have been illustrated by Andy Paciorek.

Andy Paciorek has also been in cahoots again with professor and traditional storyteller Dr. Bob Curran to unearth the grisly tome that is The Wytch Hunters’ Manual.


Also on the agenda and in progress for this year or beyond are Goddess – a volume brought to you by a female powerhouse delving into a wide variety of topics, The Choir Invisible, a book that deals with death in its varying shades of morbidity and beauty; and Urban Wyrd – a study into what happens when the harvest of folk horror and other strange fields, spills beyond the lines of town and country, both in place and mind.


Peruse our existing titles at – http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/andypaciorek

100% of profits from FHR / Wyrd Harvest Press books sold in this store will be charitably donated at intervals to different environmental, wildlife and community projects undertaken by the Wildlife Trusts.

`Unburied’ – Folk Horror takes centre stage.

From the creators of BADD : Bothered About Dungeons & Dragons comes their new project, UNBURIED – in part inspired by the first FHR event `Otherworldy’ held at the British Museum in 2016.

In 1978, HTV produced a six-part children’s Folk Horror serial called ‘Unburied’. The tapes are now missing, presumed destroyed. In the subsequent decades, its existence has become the stuff of myth. But as its 40th anniversary approaches, it’s time to dig up what little information we have on this enigmatic footnote in television history

Join Folk Horror enthusiast, Carrie Marx, as she conducts a personal investigation into the cracks in our collective memory. Beginning with a study of British television classics such as ‘Children of the Stones’, ‘The Owl Service’, and ‘Doctor Who’, Marx leaves no stone unturned as she unearths a terrifying mystery, buried in our cultural past.

Carrie’s fellow Hermetic Arts partner Chris Lince found time in their busy preparation and rehearsal schedule to speak to FHR – “UNBURIED is a mystery we’ve been delving into for the past year, and it’s taken us further back, and deeper down, than we would have ever expected. There’s lots to enjoy for fans of weird 1970s TV, but also for those interested in the hauntological and how the ghosts of the past impact on our future.”

When we questioned Chris about their approach to this production his reply will no doubt sound like a folk horror revivalist idea of heaven – but I imagine the fact that a self-written, acted and produced piece of theatre is the desired end result will have added many stresses and worries to this otherwise wonderful sounding use of one’s time….

“We were already fans of a lot of Folk Horror films (and I had watched all of Doctor Who, apart from those elusive missing 97 episodes…) but it was only since attending the British Museum Folk Horror Revival event in 2016 that we started specifically delving into the television of that era. We adore all of Nigel Kneale’s work, and spent a good chunk of Christmas holed up watching MR James adaptations.
In terms of research, Richard Molesworth’s book “Wiped”, Stephen Brotherstone and Dave Lawrence’s “Scarred For Life”, “The Edge Is Where The Centre Is” edited by SS Sandhu and, of course, Adam Scovell’s “Folk Horror” and “Field Studies” edited by Andy Paciorek and Katherine Beem, all proved invaluable, as well as blog posts by Howard Ingham, Phil Sandifer, and Jack Graham….. and from watching a lot of 1970s TV. We made a ‘Children of the Stones’ pilgrimage to Avebury last year, and spent a lot of time discussing how best to translate the ideas of Folk Horror into a live show. Film and TV benefits so much from being shot in genuinely ancient landscapes, so to create a stage show we’ve tried to approach the themes and concerns of Folk Horror from a slightly different angle…”

The Show runs from 7th – 11th March at Waterloo East Theatre as part of the VAULT Festival. Tickets are available via the booking link (vaultfestival.com/whats-on/unburied)

HERMETIC ARTS is a multidisciplinary producing partnership, creating genre work in theatre, film, podcasting, and animation. It is 50% Chris Lincé and 50% Carrie Marx. Specialising in the Dark Arts, Horror, Cryptozoology, Mischief, Science Fiction, and Odd Stuff, their previous show, BADD, (a theatrical exploration into the 1980s US Satanic Panic) premiered at the 2017 VAULT Festival, before transferring to the Brighton Fringe, and a sell-out run at the London Horror Festival.

To keep up with what Chris and Carrie are doing follow them (@hermetic_arts) on Twitter. If you’re interested in knowing more, or getting involved, contact them at info@hermetic-arts.co.uk


THE TRIANGLE OF ART: This symbol represents the protected space outside the magic circle, into which spirits are compelled to appear in Solomonic ritual magic. Its function is to concentrate the spirit being invoked into one space so that it can be seen visibly. The purpose of the triangle is to keep the manifested entity contained.

HERMETIC ARTS is committed to protecting its audience from any entities that may be manifested.

We will hand over again to Chris Lince for the final word –

“There are a lot of similarities between the creation of artistic work and the ritual behaviours of religions and mystical practices. Good theatre, like a good séance, brings people together to explore the past and dream of the future.”


Totes n Tees



In our limited edition T-shirt sell off we have the following colours and quantities available ~

Silver on Antique Cherry Red –
Ladies fit small x3

Ladies fit medium x4

Medium x2

Large x2

Rose Gold on Forest Green –

small x4

large x1

X Large x2


Silver on Blackberry –

small x1

X large x1


Price for all T-shirts:
£12.00  + £3.00 postage and packaging UK
email folkhorrorrevival@yahoo.com for overseas shirt and shipping prices.

Email – folkhorrorrevival@yahoo.com  stating size, quantity and colour – please title the message –  T

Payment is by PayPal only – folkhorrorrevival@yahoo.com
Please message before making payment as stock is limited.


We also have Tote bags still available but only 10 left in stock
Silver print on black bag

£5.00 + £3.00 postage and packaging UK
email folkhorrorrevival@yahoo.com for overseas bag and shipping prices.

Payment is by PayPal only – folkhorrorrevival@yahoo.com
Please message before making payment as stock is limited.

Colour shirts and tote bags are printed by Tyrant Design & Print



the twisted roots and sweetest fruits …



From the foundation stones of Acid Folk and Child Ballads, Occult Rock and the Blues to the influence of Folk Horror on TV and Film soundtracks, Hauntology and even mainstream Pop.

Harvest Hymns is a diverse and fascinating collection of articles, reviews and interviews with and from the likes of Jim Jupp, Maddy Prior, John Cameron, Jonny Trunk, Candia McKormack, Moon Wiring Club, Alison O’Donnell, The Soulless Party, Andrew Liles and Adam Scovell.


Available soon from Wyrd Harvest Press – the publication wing of Folk Horror Revival


Images – Jim Peters & Grey Malkin