Arcadia Review and Interview

Arcadia, Directed by Paul Wright – Review by John Pilgrim

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If you could understand. You would take my hand.
And I would spread so far, just like Arcadia.
{Psychic TV}

 

Arcadia, an idyllic image of life in the countryside, a pastoral paradise and the home of Pan, the half-goat, half-man god of Greek mythology who revels in rustic music and the company of wood nymphs.

 

The film Arcadia which, following its cinematic release, is now available in a splendid DVD package from the British Film Institute, is both consonant and dissonant with such associations as it transports the viewer into a strange world of forgotten customs, folk rituals and hidden practices from the last hundred years of British history.  For while many of the bucolic images are indeed delightful, a number of the scenes in this remarkable film surface darker currents and traditions in Albion’s recent past.

 

The publicity for Arcadia proudly promotes the film as offering ‘a visceral sensory journey through the seasons, exploring the beauty, magic and madness of our changing relationship with both the land and each other’.  This is an apt précis and Arcadia’s viscerality is indeed undeniable, with joyful scenes of dancing and naked pastoral celebration contrasting starkly with disturbing footage of fox hunting and other blood sports. Also central to the film’s sensory impact is a powerful score by Adrian Utley (Portishead) and Will Gregory (Goldfrapp) which provides dynamism and coherence to the myriad of images that are skillfully woven together by Paul Wright. Arcadia is by various turns naturalistic, dream-like and the stuff of nightmares.  Snippets of odd dialogue and disturbing images punctuate the film, disrupting the stream of cinematic consciousness, prompting the viewer to reflect on how our environment and peculiar traditions have come to shape our everyday reality in today’s Britain.

 

While focusing primarily on scenes of a pastoral nature – many of which are quite extraordinary – the film progresses on to depict British life in more contemporary urban settings. The contrast is marked and may jar for some, the viewer is implicitly challenged to reflect on whether the less desirable aspects of British rural life continue to the present day, simply manifesting themselves in new guises.

 

There is much in Arcadia that will intrigue those who are fascinated by the folk horror genre and open to exploring neighbouring cultural fields. Arcadia offers the opportunity to re-visit and reflect on Albion’s peculiar traditions. FHR was fortunate to have opportunity to pose a couple of questions to Paul Wright, Director, and to Adam Scovell, film-maker and author of Folk Horror: Hours Dreadful and Things Strange, who worked on the archive research.

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FHR: Arcadia unearths a myriad of forgotten customs, delights and horrors from the celluloid history of the British countryside. Which of these made the greatest impression on you? And what do you hope viewers might learn or reflect on, particularly in the social context in which we now find ourselves?

 

PW: Rather than merely showing the chocolate box version of the countryside that is often seen, I was a lot more interested in exploring the more unusual, hidden or forgotten versions of the land. The contrasts of darkness and light, beautiful and horrific, picturesque and the disturbing, along with feeling that different truths were emerging, like ghosts from the past, was integral to the film from the start. On a personal level it was this stranger footage I connected most with.

 

Watching some of the folk customs especially was something of a breakthrough as a lot of the material had this wild, complex energy of being both extremely appealing yet terrifying at the same time. Seeing parallels between some of these rituals and more modern day equivalents was also an exciting part of the process. It was always the idea to leave some space for the audience when viewing the film.

 

The main themes we were interested in exploring were how we connect with the land, how we connect with each other, and what changes there have been between these over the years. It was always the idea that the piece would work as an emotive, sensory experience rather than an intellectual one.

 

Something that became impossible to ignore, and was present one way or another in most of the films in the archive, was the huge inequality in Britain both then and now and how that too has taken on different guises over the years but has, ultimately, remained. It felt right that this became one of the main themes running through the film.

 

AS: The most interesting and exciting footage I watched for the film was definitely a little short M.R. James adaptation made by a local film society in the fifties. I’m not sure how much of it was used in the final film but it was very interesting in itself as it was Whistle And I’ll Come To You and it seemed to foreshadow some of the visual choices of Jonathan Miller’s 1968 version for the BBC.

 

The most horrifying thing taken from the footage was more of an accumulation of watching lots of various different blood sports. There’s so much archive material gleaned from aristocrats’ home movies and obviously one of the chief things they recorded in their day-to-day life was a variety of fox hunting, hare coursing, and various different animal management from the gentry’s farming enterprises. It was a slow, building violence, that started to seep into me every day and solidified for me the frustrating dynamic still virulent today in regards to the countryside being the playground for the rich and their violent habits, even when illegal or endangering species and other wildlife.

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FHR: How did you go about choosing the material?

 

PW: There was a lot of viewing of material, mainly of the BFI archive and later the regional archives. Pretty early on I sketched a rough structure based around the four seasons. Each season had some themes and buzzwords on what may be useful to look out for and hopefully would give the piece some sort of a narrative and progression throughout.

 

From there it was myself and Adam Scovell watching a lot of footage and marking down any moment, image or sound that was interesting or could be useful down the line. This was a pretty painstaking process, there must have been thousands of notes, but ultimately rewarding to be able to explore such rich material and of course having those moments where you knew you had found something that would be great in the film we were trying to make.

 

It was then about myself and Michael Aaglund, the editor, assembling these various highlights and starting to play around with them on the timeline, still using the rough structure of seasons as a starting place but also being open enough to let the footage itself inspire new ideas. It became a pretty organic process at this stage.

 

AS: I simply worked from Paul’s detailed list of words and themes. Sometimes there would be something that just stuck out simply because it was so odd (a small documentary on a pub that started serving garden snails, for example, which certainly wouldn’t have ticked anything specific on Paul’s list of themes), but mostly it was following Paul’s lead and figuring what would work best for his vision of Arcadia.

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www.bfi.org.uk/whats-on/bfi-film-releases/arcadia

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Winter Ghosts: What is This What is Coming? 4

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On the weekend of 15th and 16th December 2017, a strange mist will fall upon the coastal town of Whitby. From the sea fret will come haunting sounds and tales and more besides. Here over the coming days we shall in turn usher in the ghosts of winter …

Appearing at the Whitby Met as part of the Winter Ghosts event, Folk Horror Revival
are pleased to present the sinister, seasonal sounds of Equestrian Vortex featuring  Melmoth the Wanderer
Born from their mutual love of classic 1970s and 80s horror cinema this duo construct soundtracks to horror movies that were never made. Hailing from the dankest, seediest corners of Newcastle Upon Tyne, the Equestrian Vortex are here to take us into the darkest recesses of the minds of H.P. Lovecraft, Dario Argento, Aleister Crowley, Kenneth Grant, Fabio Frizzi, John Carpenter, Lucio Fulci, Jess Franco, Jose Larraz, Jorge Grau and Jean Rollin. They are an occult celebration of the hidden practices of magick and the supernatural, using their love of vintage analogue synthesizers to inspire their paeans to the darker side of culture.
Darren Charles is curator of Unearthing Forgotten Horrors, a radio show with the intent of reviving interest in classic horror movie soundtracks, wyrd psychedelia, freaky folk, and anything that doesn’t fit into the mainstream musical landscape. He has been a member of the Folk Horror Revival admin team from the group’s humble beginnings and has recently completed an MA in History from Newcastle University with a focus on 17th century witchcraft trials in England and Scotland. Darren is currently working on several projects for Folk Horror Revival, and has spoken at Cambridge University, The British Museum, Summerhall, Edinburgh and The Hepworth, Wakefield on the subject of Folk Horror.
Antony Wealls has been producing music since his late teens under various guises and genres. He is currently involved in collaborative projects The Equestrian Vortex and The Mortlake Bookclub, he also produces solo material as Time Destroys All Things.

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Integrating with The Equestrian Vortex will be Melmoth the Wanderer evoking a spirit of Jamesian ghosts of Christmas

`Shadow master and guardian of the weird and wayward’…`remixer supremo and visionary seer of the sonic pastures that lurk beyond the imagination.’ Melmoth wanders the outer reaches of The Field Bazaar collecting sounds, snatches of spoken word and music that seems as old as the timeworn paths he treads. When the burden of these sounds becomes too much for our devout and religious miscreant he visits the bedlamites, the insomniacs and those truly alone offering his audio harvest as comfort from the silence.

The Melmoth the Wanderer mixes are the result of these nocturnal visits to their creator Jim Peters – a self-confessed Audio Relic Hunter locked into the sounds of the night, the light and the half-light.

mixcloud.com/Melmoth_The_Wanderer/

Melmoth is honored to be counted as one of The Mortlake Bookclub and has also mixed and remixed for The Hare and the Moon, The Soulless Party, Zeuk, Sproatly Smith and many other artists on the Reverb Worship label.

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www.facebook.com/themortlakebookclub/

https://www.facebook.com/#!/Melmoth-The-Wanderer-277345965761781/

Visuals for the performance will be provided by Adam Scovell, author, filmmaker and creator of the Celluloid Wickerman blog
Adam Scovell is a writer and filmmaker from The Wirral, currently based in London. He is studying for a PhD in film music and transcendental style at the University of Liverpool and Goldsmiths. He has produced film and art criticism for more than 20 digital and print publications including The Times and The Guardian, runs the Blog North Awards-nominated website Celluloid Wicker Man, and has had film work screened at FACT, The Everyman Playhouse, Hackney Picturehouse and Manchester Art Gallery. In 2015, he worked with Robert Macfarlane on an adaptation of his Sunday Times bestseller, Holloway. At present he is filming a number of projects on super-8 film including a collaboration with Iain Sinclair, and has published a book on folk horror for Auteur Publishing.

 Join us at Winter Ghosts

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Winter Ghosts: What is This What is Coming? 1

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Winter Ghosts: What is This? What is Coming? 3

Folk Horror: Hours Dreadful and Things Strange by Adam Scovell – Book Review

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“What exactly is Folk Horror? Is it the writing of M.R. James and Alan Garner? Is it the television scripts of Nigel Kneale, John Bowen and David Rudkin, the films of David Gladwell and The Blood On Satan s Claw? Or could it be the paranoid Public Information Films of the 1970s; the Season Of The Witch ; The Advisory Circle reminding us to Mind how you go! ; or perhaps a contemporary story of two hit-men caught unknowingly in a class-saturated ritual of violence? Interest in the ancient, the occult, and the wyrd is on the rise. The furrows of Robin Hardy, Piers Haggard and Michael Reeves have arisen again, as has the Spirit of Dark of Lonely Water, Juganets, cursed Saxon crowns, spaceships hidden under ancient barrows, owls and flowers, time-warping stone circles, wicker men, the goat of Mendes, and malicious stone tapes. Folk Horror: Hours Dreadful And Things Strange charts the summoning of these esoteric arts within the latter half of the twentieth century and beyond, using theories of Psychogeography, Hauntology and Topography to delve into the genre s output in film, television and multimedia as its sacred demon of ungovernableness rises yet again in the twenty-first century.”

It may seem biased that Adam Scovell’s book  be reviewed here as he is part of the Folk Horror Revival cabal but let me state that Adam was invited into the circle because of the high quality of his work and his passion for his interests. Also I won’t review anything I dislike (I am not paid to be a critic so do not do negativity for free) so this book is entirely here on its own merit. So here we go …
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It is a hard line that Adam treads here, producing a work that is suitable both for academic film and cultural studies and a book accessible for those first entering into the sub genre.  And it is an extremely difficult sub genre to define, not is it only extremely sinuous but it is currently evolving into new and different directions. If anyone therefore is qualified to take on this task and to tread that line, it is certainly Adam Scovell. He approaches the subject both with a curiosity and a cunning insight of themes that are at times ineffable. He does not resort to the tact of the usual film / book critic and simply express his opinion but delves to understand the subject under his microscope in great detail and not only catalogue their relevance as art and narrative but also the social, political and anthropological significance.

For all fans and scholars of folk horror and related sub-genres this book is indispensable. Scovell proves himself an excellent writer as the level of research and consideration in this book is impeccable yet it is not at all dry and is a captivating, flowing read for every body interested in the subject matter, not only those involved in academic field studies.
Many examples of folk horror are investigated and discussed (as such beware of spoilers for films and Tv plays you may not have seen yet) and also their relation to akin subjects such as the Urban Wyrd, Hauntology, Backwoods Horror, Ruralism and Southern Gothic.
This book investigates its subject matter with a contagious passion and does extremely well to explain a subject that is nebulous and still evolving. Whilst concentrating mostly on film the book also explores such matter as Public Information Films and the design and music of the Ghost Box label.
As well as being a very worthy addition to Auteur’s film study publication oeuvre it is an essential read for all fans of folk horror and the sinuous other company it keeps.

The one issue which is not down to Scovell, is that the book would certainly benefit from illustration throughout. Something Auteur may consider as I am sure a more visual tome would do well, but for text alone Folk Horror: Hours Dreadful and Things Strange is welcomed as the first book of its type to broach the subject and is highly recommended.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Folk-Horror-Dreadful-Things-Strange/dp/1911325221

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https://celluloidwickerman.com/

Review: Hours Dreadful & Things Strange

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Fans of folk horror, hauntology, psychogeography, visionary ruralism, the urban wyrd and other such strange edges will proably be no stranger to the name of Adam Scovell or perhaps his thorough and impressive website Celluloid Wicker Man

Adam is a writer and filmmaker currently based between Liverpool and London He has produced film and art criticism for over twenty publications including The Times and The Guardian, runs the Celluloid Wicker Man website and has had work screened and given lectures at places as esteemed as Cambridge University, The British Museum, The BFI, The Everyman Playhouse, Queen’s University – Belfast, Hackney Picturehouse and Manchester Art Gallery.

Within his first book for film and media publishing house Auteur , Scovell wanders forests and fields to unearth answers to the thorny question  “What is Folk Horror?” It is quite a task for folk horror is not simply a subgenre of horror but is a subgenre of various other genres and subgenres and it is also conversely unique in itself.
The Unholy Trinity of films, Blood on Satan’s Claw, Witchfinder General and The Wicker Man do of course get thorough necessary attention, but this book gives cause for any of the opinion that folk horror is a 3 movie phenomenon, much cause to think again.  Scovell, the creator of Scovell’s Chain – a system of defining elements of folk horror succeeds in outlining and showcasing diverse examples of folk horror and related fields, but does not hammer its legs down with iron stakes in too rigid a definition allowing folk horror to continue to wander myriad paths and remain as an evolving entity.
Kwaidan, Picnic at Hanging Rock, The Ballad of Tam Lin,True Detective, Penda’s Fen, Quatermass, Children of the Stones and many many other films, tv shows are given the full (Owl) service and prove that folk horror is not limted to the British Isles as some folk would kid you believe. .

For all fans and scholars of folk horror and related sub-genres this book is indispensable. Scovell proves himself an excellent writer as the level of research and consideration in this book is impeccable yet it is not at all dry and is a captivating, flowing read for every body interested in the subject matter, not only those involved in academic field studies.
Many examples of folk horror are investigated and discussed (as such beware of spoilers for films and Tv plays you may not have seen yet) and also their relation to akin subjects such as the Urban Wyrd, Hauntology, Backwoods Horror, Ruralism and Southern Gothic.
This book investigates its subject matter with a contagious passion and does extremely well to explain a subject that is nebulous and still evolving. Whilst concentrating mostly on film the book also explores such matter as Public Information Films and the design and music of the Ghost Box label.
As well as being a very worthy addition to Auteur’s film study publication ouvre it is an essential read for all fans of folk horror and the sinuous other company it keeps.

Folk Horror Revival looks forward very much to reading further books and watching new films in future from Adam.

Hours Dreadful & Things Strange is available from Amazon and other book stores.

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Otherworldly: Through the Eyes of Jason Atomic

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Chris Lambert Singing

Jason Atomic is an artist inspired by a love of underground cultures, scenes and fashion tribes, he investigates and documents them in his sketchbooks as quick, clean line drawings.

This love of fashion has led to collaborations with labels Charles of London, Yes!Future! & Milkboy Tokyo.

His speedy drawing style led to the development of live portrait sketching performances in galleries, clubs and at events around the world, during these he makes life-size, full-length sketches of his willing victims in marker pen on long rolls of paper. In  2008 he set an un-official world land/speed record for portraiture at The National Portrait Gallery, London.

He has curated various art shows on occult & comic book themes, Including Hail To The King (a tribute to Jack Kirby), Iconography Of Mask, Image Duplicator (a response to Roy Lichtenstein) & Magick Eye.

More recently, upon discovering that an anagram of his name is ‘Satanic Mojo’, he has embarked on a multi-platform collaborative project of that title. Inspired by cults, conspiracy theories and the counter culture.

This has spawned ‘Satanic Mojo Comix’, an annual ‘Festival Of Dark Arts’ and seasonal ‘Satanic Flea Market’

 

The Satanic Mojo Manifesto

https://vimeo.com/91959688

www.jasonatomic.co.uk

www.satanicmojo.com

On October 16th Jason ventured into the hallowed halls of the British Museum to observe and capture the Folk Horror Revival: Otherworldly event … this is what he saw …
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Lee Gerrard-Barlow

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Shirley Collins
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Jim Peters & Sharron Kraus

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Reece Shearsmith
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Andy Paciorek & Darren Charles
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Adam Scovell
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James Riley  & Gary Lachman

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Gary Parsons

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Shirley Collins & Reece Shearsmith

All Images © Jason Atomic

An Otherworldly Thank You

 

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poster © Becca Thorne

I would like to say a HUGE THANK YOU to Everyone who made the Folk Horror Revival British Museum weekend truly Otherworldly.

Firstly Immense gratitude goes to Jim Peters whose hard work on this event was incredible and immaculate. Thanks also to the fabulous work by our compere Chris Lambert, the administration work undertaken by all our team, those present at London and those who kept the group running in our absence. Thanks to the British Museum staff, Treadwell’s Books, The Atlantis Bookshop,and The Last Tuesday Society & The Viktor Wynd Museum of Curiosities for their great support and kindness. To our incredible speakers and guests and to all Revivalists that came along. We hope you enjoyed yourself.

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Photos © Jason D. Brawn

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Photos © Marc Beattie

Thank You Very Much to Shirley Collins, Reece Shearsmith, Iain Sinclair, Gary Lachman, Adam Scovell, Bob Beagrie and his great musical support to Leasungspell, Michael Somerset and the Consumptives, James Riley, Lee Gerrard- Barlow, Sharron Kraus,Gary Parsons, Darren Charles, Eamon Byers, John Pilgrim, Katherine Sherry Beem, Matthelos Peachyoza, Phil Rose, Stuart Silver, Dr John Callow, Rich Blackett, Cobweb Mehers, Peter Lagan, John Chadwick, Dan Hunt, Scott Lyall, Graeme Cunningham, Richard Hing, Carmit Kordov, Andy Sharp, Bob Fischer, Andrew McGuigan, Andri Anna, Becca Thorne, Stephen Canner, Harri Pitkäniemi, Jackie Taylor, Säde Säjké, Grey Malkin, Erin Christina Sorrey Jonas Halsall at Tyrant Design and Print, all the contributors to our books and music mixes and Status Quo, and if I have forgotten anyone a thousand apologies, blame the absinthe

All the support we have been shown and given has been phenomenal and very deeply appreciated.

Thank You
Andy Paciorek

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Photo © Candia McCormack

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Merchandise by Jonas Halsall at Tyrant Design and Print

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http://www.theatlantisbookshop.com/

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https://www.treadwells-london.com/

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http://www.thelasttuesdaysociety.org/museum-curiosities/

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More images and further information about the event to come over time …

Folk Horror Revival at the British Museum – SOLD OUT

The Folk Horror Revival: Otherworldly event at the British Museum, London on 16th October 2016 – has now Sold Out.

Thank You Very Much to everybody who bought a ticket – Enjoy 🙂

The event will feature –

Gary Lachman

Iain Sinclair

Bob Beagrie  ~ Leagunspell

Michael Somerset & The Consumptives

Eamon Byers

Adam Scovell

Gary Parsons

Yvonne Salmon

Andy Paciorek

James Riley 

 Darren Charles

Lee Gerrard-Butler

+ Very special Guests

Your compere for the day (if the Black Meadow mist allows him to escape) is Chris Lambert.

The event has been brought together by the hard work and  tireless efforts of Jim Peters with help from the FHR administration cabal.
Thanks everyone 🙂

Folk Horror Revival : British Museum Otherworldly Ticket Release

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Tomorrow Morning (Wednesday 7th September) at 9am (BST) tickets for the Folk Horror Revival Otherworldly Event at The British Museum go on sale.

The event itself takes place on Sunday 16th October starting at 10:30 and runs until 17:00. It also ties in with other Folk Horror events that have been arranged on the Saturday for those who wish to make a weekend of it. Details of these other events are to follow.

To purchase tickets you will need to click on the following link and follow the instructions. Tickets cost £20 with a £1.43 booking fee.

There are only 300 tickets available so I would advise you set your alarm clocks to make sure you get your ticket.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/otherworldly-a-special-event-for-halloween-tickets-26517167562

Once you have purchased a ticket you will receive a confirmation e-mail which you will need to print out and bring with you to the event as proof of purchase.

You will also be asked for your name and e-mail address when booking – please fill this out as it will mean we will be able to notify you of future events and it will also help us with booking people in on the day.

Treadwell’s Bookshop will be stocking special FHR merchandise all that weekend including tee-shirts, books and cds so make sure you include a visit to their wonderful emporium whilst you are in town for the event. Treadwell’s is a few minutes’ walk from the museum in Store Street and well worth an explore.

Appearing for your pleasure and entertainment will be ~

Gary Lachman

Iain Sinclair

Bob Beagrie  ~ Leagunspell

Michael Somerset & The Consumptives

Eamon Byers

Adam Scovell

Gary Parsons

Yvonne Salmon

Andy Paciorek

James Riley 

 Darren Charles

Lee Gerrard-Butler

Your compere for the day (if the Black Meadow mist allows him to escape) is Chris Lambert.

The event has been brought together by the hard work and  tireless efforts of Jim Peters

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see also ~

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (First Reveal)

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Second Reveal)

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Third Reveal)
Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Fourth Reveal)

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Fifth Reveal)https://folkhorrorrevival.com/2016/09/06/1156/

 

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Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Second Reveal)

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The first Folk Horror Revival event will be taking place at the British Museum, London on  October 16th 2016, featuring talks, lectures, short films, poetry readings, museum tours and other wyrd and intriguing happenings.

Cult television programmes and films of the 1960s and 70s are inspiring a new generation of poets, writers, artists and musicians with their atmospheric themes of contemporary individuals interacting with a uniquely British world of ancient mythology and magic, often uncanny and unsettling.

This special event will feature lectures, film screenings, performances and gallery tours of featured objects in the Museum’s collection to explore themes of cultural rituals, earth mysteries, psychogeography and folklore. Come along and prepare to be scared!

Ticket details to be announced very shortly.

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We are proud to reveal other additions to the line up – see also

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (First Reveal)

Eamon Byers completed his PhD at Queen’s University Belfast in 2014. His thesis explored the interaction between medievalism and folk music in English culture from the eighteenth century to the present day. Also in 2014, he co-organised ‘A Fiend in the Furrows: Perspectives on ‘Folk Horror’ in Literature, Film & Music’, the first conference dedicated to the academic study of folk horror.
He currently teaches English at Marymount International School London and continues to research and publish on the interactions between folk culture and medievalism in music, literature and politics.

The title of Eamon’s talk is: ‘The Ghost of Song: Folkmusic in the 21st Century’ where he will be looking at the influence of folk horror on contemporary folk, breaking down some hauntological examples and discussing sampling and the theoretical aspects of tradition and ancestry that goes along with modern folk.

Follow him on Twitter at – https://twitter.com/folkoff

 

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In addition to speakers and other live performers we will also be screening some short films by talnted film makers. The first of the filmmakers to be revealed is Adam Scovell.

Adam is a writer and filmmaker currently based between Liverpool and London He has produced film and art criticism for over twenty publications including The Times and The Guardian, runs the Celluloid Wicker Man website and has had work screened at FACT, The Everyman Playhouse, Hackney Picturehouse and Manchester Art Gallery.
Adam is the creator of the intriguing and impressive blog Celluloid Wicker Man

The title of Adam’s talk is Analogue Hauntings – The Ghost In The Grain
Why do ghosts manifest so effectively through analogue technology? Whether through tapes made of stone, through signal mechanisms on old Dickensian railway stations or through alchemically enhanced binoculars, ghosts have a tendency to achieve corporeality most powerfully in fictional media through pre-digital technologies. In this mixture of presentation and screenings, this phenomena will be examined within the contexts of hauntology, Nigel Kneale, M.R. James and filmic practice on super-8 celluloid.

Screenings :
• Salthouse Marshes (2015) (7:16) – Super-8 ghost stories inspired by Algernon Blackwood’s The Willows.

• No Diggin’ Here (2016) (3:07) – Super-8 essay film looking at Aldeburgh in the context of M.R. James’ A Warning To The Curious with a specially composed score by Laura Cannell. (Preview screening)

 

More speakers and ticket details to be revealed soon. Follow us on Facebook

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The Hallowed Halls of Learning: Folk Horror at Cambridge University

 

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On the 7th July 2016, by happenchance the anniversary of Cambridge’s son Syd Barrett, Folk Horror Revivalists Adam Scovell, Andy Sharp, Gary Parsons, Darren Charles and Andy Paciorek were all invited to speak alongside several other interesting chroniclers of the wyrd at the Alchemical Landscapes II symposium at Girton College,  University of Cambridge – the same seat of learning at which  Deliah Derbyshire studied.

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The talks given that day were ~

Jo Melvin (Chelsea College of Arts)

Double Exposure: ’pataphysics and the Rural in Barry Flanagan’s Sculptural Practice

Lewis Wynn (University of Cambridge)

The Visual Occulture of Left Fields: Reclaiming the Radical History of Fields in Contemporary English Film

Adam Scovell (Goldsmiths / Celluloid Wicker Man)

Rurality in the Films of David Gladwell

Liberty Rowley (Four Feet Films)

Microgeography and an Exploration of the Magic that can be Found at the Bottom of the Garden

Harry Baker, (London Film School)

Folk Horror and the Mythic Cycle

Gary Parsons (University of East London)

British Witchcraft Documentaries of the 1970s and their Relation to Landscape and Culture

Christopher Josiffe (Independent Researcher)

The Dalby Spook in his Landscape: Gef the Talking Mongoose

(Un) remembered

Andy Paciorek (Wyrd Harvest Press)

Darren Charles (Unearthing Forgotten Horrors)

The Folk Horror Revival

Andy Sharp (English Heretic)
Video Anxieties

Marc Atkins and Rod Mengham (Sounding Pole Films)

The Fields of England

Folk Horror Revival would like to thank Yvonne Salmon and James Riley for their interest and enthusiasm in our various work and the kind hospitality they showed.
We thoroughly enjoyed the day and all the talks and look forward to more symposiums to come.

Keep watching the horizon …

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Photos: Andy Paciorek. Except third image by Yvonne Salmon