Winter Ghosts Announcement Number 2

Apologies for the delay in publishing this, our second Winter Ghosts announcement, but we have been very busy bringing together a lineup that will hopefully whet the appetite of Revivalists everywhere. Anyway, without further ado here are our latest additions to the lineup.

The Soulless Party

 

 

Since 2013 Chris Lambert and Kev Oyston of the Soulless Party have worked tirelessly to bring the mysteries and secrets of the Black Meadow into the public eye. As everyone knows The Black Meadow is located just a few miles from Whitby on the outskirts of the village of Sleights. A strange place where, it is said, that if the mist rises a village will appear. This a place populated by tales of horse-men, meadow hags, land spheres, rag and bone men, maidens of mist, strange rituals and unexplained phenomena. It is no coincidence that this is where the MOD chose to put one of their bases – RAF Fylingdales whose strange Golf Ball Radomes dominated the landscape until the early 1990’s. The Soulless Party will launch their new collection of findings at Whitby Ghosts as they share a haunting mix of music, song, stories, images and interviews. This will be a hauntological experience in which folk horror meets urban legend through the medium of electronica tinged memory and dream.

Find out more about Black Meadow and The Soulless Party by visiting:
Sarah Steel
sarah

Sarah Steele graduated from Durham with a Degree in Geology in1992. She has since qualified as a professional gemmologist and was awarded Fellowship of the Gemmological Association of Great Britain in 2013, and subsequently Diamond Fellowship in 2015. Sarah is also a member of the International Accredited Gemologists Association and is a regularly asked to speak and deliver workshops at gem conferences around the world. She is also a freelance writer for Gems and Jewellery Magazine. Sarah’s particular expertise lies in the identification of natural thermoset and thermoplastic materials used in C19th jewellery, and she is considered the world’s leading authority on the Jet Group of gemstones. Her research collaborations are challenging our previous perceptions of the material jet. Sarah will return to Durham university in October to continue her postgraduate research on the subject. We are very pleased to have Sarah with us in December to give us a rather fascinating talk on her key topic of interest, Whitby Jet. Sarah is the only scientist currently working in the field of Jet research, and as such it is a prilevege for us at Folk Horror Revival to have her on board to present especially for us a talk about her research and the cultural and historic importance of this most beautiful and tactile gem.

Home

Barbara Ravelhofer

Barbara Ravelhofer is Professor in English Literature at Durham University and a Research Associate of the Centre for History and Economics, Cambridge. After a degree in English and German Literature from the University of Munich she continued for her Ph.D. at Trinity College, Cambridge, and was awarded a Junior Research Fellowship at St John’s College. She has also held Visiting Fellowships at the Universities of Bologna, Princeton, and Harvard.

barbara ravelhofer

Professor Ravelhofer is co-director of the Records of Early English Drama North-East, which is sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). The key aim of the organisation is to find, catalogue and edit all records pertaining to music, spectacle, ceremony, dance and theatre in England’s North-East from about the ninth century to 1642. The project is directed by Prof. Ravelhofer in collaboration with Prof. John McKinnell and the Institute for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (IMEMS) Durham, the Cathedral and Durham’s World Heritage Site. Prof. Ravelhofer will be speaking to us about the history and folklore behind this wonderful tradition, and whilst the good professor herself is a big enough coup she will also be accompanied by an actual Mari Lwyd who will be loose in the auditorium.

For further details about the Records of Early English Drama North-East please see the project website.

Peter Kennedy

Dark Arts Circus - me in top hat and O

Peter Kennedy is a writer born in a North-East fishing village, who as a child was told a story about how the plague moved up country in the 17th century. In it, the fishermen decided that the best way to stave off the pestilence would be to throw fishing nets over the archway leading to the headland.  This legend was the inspiration for Peter to write his story Behind the Net Curtain, which would become the opening chapter of his debut novel Fishermen’s Tales. Inspired by that story Peter went off on a quest for more northern folklore that celebrated its maritime heritage. He trawled the seas, combed the beaches and crafted a collection of dark fables, from sea coal and rumour, and driftwood and bullshit.

The stories compiled in Fishermen’s Tales are part of an older oral tradition that were shared around campfires and passed down through generations. In reference to the book Peter says he is “trying to reclaim and romanticise the working class heritage that I came from. I read at a poetry club one night and one of the other performers said ‘this guy’s brought his own mythology’. I thought, ‘yeah, he gets it!” Over time the novel became a project that included musical accompaniment and theatrical performance, which is what Peter will be bringing to Winter Ghosts this December.

CrossInverted

That’s it for this announcement, they join Burd Ellen, Al Ridenour, Elaine Edmunds, Laurence Mitchell and George Cromack on this year’s lineup. We still have one or two acts to announce and our programme of short films to come, but we’ll leave those for another time. Tickets are available now, priced at the princely sum of £13 sterling for the full day or just £7 for the evening session, these are available from Eventbrite at the link below.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/folk-horror-revival-presents-winter-ghosts-tickets-55468722442

 

Advertisements

10% Discount – Wyrd Harvest Press

No photo description available.

Save 10% on all Wyrd Harvest Press books

Code: LULU10

Only one code can be used at a time but is additionally compatible to any discounts currently set on certain WHP books

Not valid for eBooks or services

Ends August 1 at 11:59 PM

Coupon codes are case-sensitive

wood-wallpaper-hd-517-587-hd-wallpapers logo

Sales profits from FHR / Wyrd Harvest Press books sold in this store will be charitably donated at intervals to different environmental, wildlife and community projects undertaken by the Wildlife Trusts.

Charity Donation: Summer 2019

bees.jpg
Not the Bees!! … Yes! The Bees …

Wyrd Harvest Press and Folk Horror Revival are very pleased to announce that we have charitably donated £600 to Derbyshire Wildlife Trust’s Feel The Buzz Bee appeal from the profits of our books.

Thank you to everyone who voted in our poll and especially to those who bought our books. Not only are you buying great books by a wealth of talent, you are also helping out extremely good causes.

We will continue to support The Wildlife Trusts‘ environmental conservation projects with our book sales so please keep buying our tomes –

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/andypaciorek
https://scontent.fman2-2.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/64576306_2085764905059835_7046104744867135488_n.jpg?_nc_cat=106&_nc_oc=AQkNXAAhHevEmS2EvHBcQOSde7AuDO_AYGMh0-GsKxlnyNsWdkfPGF5nyPfxmiFJv7A&_nc_ht=scontent.fman2-2.fna&oh=95810501ba9363c138d87d6b85b08605&oe=5DA2002C
https://scontent.fman2-2.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/67324042_2085764965059829_2608133390305591296_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_oc=AQmTP2aJvW5PnuYvPojjkk37NH6iNzW7EHRYhXdrbfdcWaZnSNPayDu2W0K5ybCU1oQ&_nc_ht=scontent.fman2-2.fna&oh=69e1c7641d872907eb2ad569ab9fdb65&oe=5DDED437

https://scontent.fman2-2.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/65577186_2069422900027369_8932697403404845056_n.jpg?_nc_cat=109&_nc_oc=AQmHlVw_6WMLjoAfmYBjoEDNgxEP0-RIuu6hp9V52eyOzEaK0QKo770jHrxHBFO77zk&_nc_ht=scontent.fman2-2.fna&oh=8ac575eebfaec96f57cd2bf99e0cbca8&oe=5DACBC36

Urban Wyrd : Spirits of Time and Place

fade

Now available from Wyrd Harvest Press
Folk Horror Revival – Urban Wyrd: 1. Spirits of Time

sot fc grunge temp.jpg

Discover Hauntology, Weird Technology & Transport, Hauntings and much much more in the realms of TV, Film, Literature, Art, Culture , Lore and Life. Travel in time and spaces with Adam Scovell, Stephen Volk, Scarfolk, Julianne Regan, Sebastian Backziewicz, Sara Hannant, The Black Meadow and many other contributors.

And
Folk Horror Revival – UrbanWyrd: 2. Spirits of Place

sop fc grunge

Urban Wyrd – Spirits of Place. Discover within its winding streets Psychogeography, Genii Loci, Edgelands, Urban Exploration, Weird Places and many other strange matters within film, TV, music, literature, life and culture. Perambulate in the company of such contributors as Will Self, K.A. Laity, Bob Fischer, Iain Sinclair, Diane A. Rodgers, John Coulthart, Karl Bell and many many more.

Available now from –

https://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?keyWords=urban+wyrd&type=

100% of profits from FHR / Wyrd Harvest Press books sold in our Lulu store is charitably donated at intervals to different environmental, wildlife and community projects undertaken by the Wildlife Trusts.

1

NEW BOOKS: Folk Horror Revival: Urban Wyrd Spirits of Time + Place

https://scontent.fman2-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/65085999_2065679173735075_1342696086279553024_n.jpg?_nc_cat=103&_nc_oc=AQm4ZcwgBupGXpRAK0CxrHYEt7Du95vO1Ks-2ZbInuY9bTBVLb5MTNxRo-gNuH_cDhs&_nc_ht=scontent.fman2-1.fna&oh=78465fa2f795c87369482220be19ec1c&oe=5D8AC77A

…This is not a test … we interrupt this transmission to alert …

Folk Horror Revival: Urban Wyrd –

1. Spirits of Time

+

2: Spirits of Place

are available to purchase now …

Launch offer 35% Discount on each book

(20% added automatically – to gain a further 15% Discount enter code  ONEFIVE  at checkout – Code valid until end of 27th June 2019)

Purchase both volumes together to save on shipping costs

Buy now from

Spirits of Time

+

Spirits of Place

All sales profits from purchases made at our book shop

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/andypaciorek

are charitably donated to The Wildlife Trusts

This is not a test …repeat this is not a test …

Contents – (to enlarge when viewing on computer – right click – view image)

https://scontent.fman2-2.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/64873126_2064381387198187_5580075984033415168_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_oc=AQm8Z9X_VT8NQjP4Bb8_Wrx-NEj9paqazQIKhQfp7qyRnyDlutjS1MUjN-pMGaKhC-Y&_nc_ht=scontent.fman2-2.fna&oh=f71a461dcae55ed8831a3837aed5f550&oe=5DC3957B

https://scontent.fman2-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/65162995_2064381550531504_1583259897473007616_o.jpg?_nc_cat=105&_nc_oc=AQnj32q9R7xoASu48gN18NVPfB7eWRcP-f6uDR60uIjNNLwsmEoH76cJy-y_ps4DWeI&_nc_ht=scontent.fman2-1.fna&oh=6f552e227b55f50bba2f7c721329f8f1&oe=5DBB0A4C

https://scontent.fman2-2.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/65241772_2064381480531511_3094412563971047424_n.jpg?_nc_cat=109&_nc_oc=AQmmSHe5zDEArf0GR0YG53b0S9q4bPnLE9sKN5xC7iSrTCOxEV7mF2HyAyRKeQ3iYl4&_nc_ht=scontent.fman2-2.fna&oh=1d4716301bce75391fdde00d3ea6cfc6&oe=5D8761F1

https://scontent.fman2-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/65005523_2064381653864827_690580159366955008_o.jpg?_nc_cat=108&_nc_oc=AQnw8gwkE84-qSaJOUIBIS5ZBboXbCZ8h6ftEBHMqReuC93JeiWVVY3cBXX2ihzIYk8&_nc_ht=scontent.fman2-1.fna&oh=16870361a1a9e924cadee8454561364d&oe=5D79A315

fade

Summer Spirits: Shadows on the Fen and Kit Lewis Interview

Image result for summer spirits shadows on the fen

CULTure Babylon and Folk Horror Revival present a one-day Midsummer celebration of the spirits and folklore of the East Anglian landscape in fact and fiction. Including talks, live music, live readings of stories of the supernatural and a rare screening of 70s Folk Horror Classic, Penda’s Fen. We felt it was about time we told you a little more about this wonderful event, and the rather fabulous speakers we have lined up for you.

Summer Spirits takes place 2pm – 10pm Saturday June 22 at the Space Upstairs – the Priory Centre, Downham Market, Norfolk. Tickets priced £15.

Image result for summer spirits shadows on the fen louise hodgson

Louise Hodgson: Deep into the Land – the Beauty and the Terror

Louise Hodgson, has spent most of her life in areas of natural beauty.
She has taught classes at a local College on ‘Landscape and Spirituality’ and given workshops on both the Earth Mysteries and Shamanism.

We are very pleased that Louise will be bringing her talk sharing her fascination with the hidden landscape and exploring some of her own experiences of both light and dark sides of connecting with the landscape.

Image result for Dr francis young

Dr Francis Young: Bogie Tales of East Anglia

Dr Young, an expert on the history of catholicism in East Anglia will be talking about his most recent publication – a reprinted edition of the earliest book devoted to East Anglian folklore, Bogie Tales of East Anglia (1891) by Margaret Helen James. Bogie Tales is an important folklore collection and until now has been so rare that copies have been known to sell online for over £1,500.
http://francisyoung.wordpress.com

Image result for edward parnell summer spirits

Ed Parnell: Reading from ‘Ghostland’

Edward Parnell has had a lifelong interest in ghost stories and horror films. His first book, the gothic, WWII-set The Listeners (2014), won the Rethink New Novels Prize. His new narrative non-fiction book, Ghostland, will be published by William Collins in October 2019. In it he examines the haunted landscapes that inspired writers including M. R. James, Algernon Blackwood and William Hope Hodgson – as well as trying to lay to rest his own haunted past.

Image result for christine pike ladychillers

Christine Pike: Live readings of tales of the supernatural and macabre

Christine is a lifelong fan of Gothic fiction and is the inspiration behind Lady Chillers – a touring project created to revive the works of forgotten women authors of ghost stories in atmospheric performed readings. Christine will be reading three stories, including one from Norfolk’s own Elizabeth Coulson.
Image result for sharron kraus
Sharron Kraus

Sharron Kraus is a singer of folk songs, a songwriter and multi-instrumentalist whose solo work and collaborations offer a dark and subversive take on traditional music. As well as drawing on the folk traditions of England and Appalachia, her music is influenced by gothic literature, surrealism, myth and magick. Sharron will be performing two live acoustic sets for us.

Related image
FILM: Penda’s Fen (1974) Writer: David Rudkin Dir. Alan Clarke

Set against the backdrop of the Malvern Hills, Penda’s Fen has become a classic of Folk Horror television. An adolescent parson’s son must question everything he believes and holds true: his religion, his sexuality, his family, in order to grow and develop into an adult. Angels, Edward Elgar and King Penda himself all make appearances in this made-for-television drama, which after 45 years remains powerful and challenging.

Tickets for this wonderful event are priced at just £15.00 per person.

http://summerspirits.culturebabylon.com

Image result for summer spirits shadows on the fen

 

Kit Lewis Interview

We also thought it was high time we  had a chat with Kit Lewis, head honcho at CULTure Babylon and the driving force behind Summer Spirits. Kit very kindly took time out of his busy schedule to answer a few questions about Summer Spirits, CULTure Babylon, his other event Fear in the Fens and Folk Horror in general.

Image result for kit lewis fear in the fens

1.Can you tell our readers a little bit about CULTure Babylon, what it’s aims are and how it all came about?

CULTure Babylon is an arts organisation that aims to put the CULT into culture – we provide events based around cult film and other media combined with leading speakers on related subjects.
People seem to find something very satisfying about this combination of information and pure entertainment.  

2. Summer Spirits – Shadows on the Fen is a new event that is taking place June 22nd in Downham Market, Can you tell us a little bit about the event and those involved?

This is going to be a different kind of event to some that we’ve put on, as it is going to have such a wide variety of entertainment, from live readings of ghost stories to film, and from book readings to acoustic music. Throughout the day, there will be something different happening all the time.

We’ve got some great speakers:

We are very pleased that Louise Hodgson,will be bringing her talk Deep into the Land – the Beauty and the Terror in which she shares her fascination with the hidden landscape and explores some of her own experiences of both light and dark sides of connecting with the landscape.

Dr Francis Young will be talking about his most recent publication – a reprinted edition of the earliest book devoted to East Anglian folklore, Bogie Tales of East Anglia (1891) by Margaret Helen James. 
Bogie Tales is an important folklore collection which had almost entirely disappeared from view. Very few copies survive, and the book is so rare that copies have been known to sell online for over £1,500.

Ed Parnell will be reading from his book, ’Ghostland’– a narrative non-fiction book about how the British landscape has influenced various writers, filmmakers and artists whose work deals with the weird and the eerie.  

We’ll also have live performance:

Christine Pike is a lifelong fan of Gothic fiction and is the inspiration behind Lady Chillers – a touring project created to revive the works of forgotten women authors of ghost stories in atmospheric performed readings.She will be reading stories set in summer – that have a winter chill about them.

Sharron Kraus is a singer of folk songs, a songwriter and multi-instrumentalist whose solo work and collaborations offer a dark and subversive take on traditional music. As well as drawing on the folk traditions of England and Appalachia, her music is influenced by gothic literature, surrealism, myth and magick. Sharron will be providing two short sets for us during the day.

3. Summer Spirits is billed as a celebration of East Anglian landscape in folklore, fact and fiction, can you tell us a little bit about some of the foklore that is local to the area?

Like a lot of very rural areas, Christianity came to Norfolk quite late, so the ‘old ways’ remain very much part of the culture here. The most notable legend is teh giant balck dog with red eyes called Black Shuck, which can either be an omen of death, or a protector of those out on the fens at night, depending on which stories you listen to.
This was also where Matthew Hopkins did a lot of his work, and there is a lot of history around the witch trials in the region too.

4. You are screening the Alan Clarke classic Penda’s Fen, one of the true Folk Horror masterpieces of UK 70s TV. Do you think that modern Folk Horror films can stand the test of time in the same way something like Penda’s Fen, Red Shift or The Stone Tape can?

Time will tell… in my experience of cult films, it’s often the least popular film of its day that goes on to gain a lasting audience.If you think of a film like Psychomania (1973), which was considered so poor at the time, that George Sanders is said to have killed himself after seeing a preview – that’s a film that gets a lot of love now.

5. Can I ask you how you got into organising events of this nature? 

My wife was working in an art gallery that had a pop-up cinema kit for hire.
I hired it for the evening, screened my favourite film, Night of the Demon (1957) and asked Tony Earnshaw (who wrote the definitive book on the film) to come and talk about it…

We got around 30 people to turn up for that, and I just about broke even.
I basically wanted to put on the kind of events that I’d like to go to (but nobody did)… I’m now in my fourth year of running a three-day festival!

55489162_2621418254554994_2039403424516145152_o

6. Fear in the Fens has become something of a favourite weekend in the Folk Horror calendar and this years looks like being no exception with a marvellous lineup taking shape. Do you think Summer Spirits has the potential to become another key event like this?

I hope so. Fear in the Fens takes up a lot of time and energy, so I can’t put on as many small events as I’d like, so last May we put on ‘Ruined Childhood’ a celebration of children’s television of the 70s, which was great.
There’s definitely a vacant slot for a summer event for CULTure Babylon, and it would be great if Summer Spirits could become a regular thing.

7. One question we always like to ask is how would you define Folk Horror?

To me Folk Horror is about the notion that nature is sentient – and does not wish us well. I’ve often been in the countryside and had an unsettling sense that, despite the landscape being aesthetically pleasing and the environment itself not hazardous, it was hostile. There was a pretty woods on the River Tamar near where my sister lived in Devon. I felt that hostility there and later learned it had been the scene of  number of unpleasant incidents…
That to me is folk horror, a sense of place, and a feeling of dread.

60968909_2731656370197848_1123887766204055552_n

Summer Spirits takes place 2pm – 10pm Saturday June 22 at the Space Upstairs – the Priory Centre, Downham Market, Norfolk. Tickets are priced £15.

https://tinyurl.com/y6obofm3

 

Folk Horror Revival – Winter Ghosts 2019 – First Announcement!

This December, Folk Horror Revival, will be returning to Whitby for our second Winter Ghosts event. The all day happening takes place at the Metropole ballroom, on December 14th 2019. The event will run from 1pm until after midnight and features some truly outstanding talks, stories, music, films and much, much more besides. The lineup itself has been handpicked by our team, and features some truly incredible talent that we simply can’t wait for you to see.

It is with much excitement that we would like to announce Al Ridenour as our first guest.

Image result for al ridenour

Explore the authentic folklore, history and contemporary practices associated with the Krampus with Al Ridenour, author of The Krampus and the Old, Dark Christmas and
preeminent English-language expert on the subject. Ridenour’s lively presentation,
illustrated with slides, archival video (and a drop-in by a LIVE KRAMPUS) reveals how
this often-misunderstood figure is connected to centuries-old witchcraft beliefs and an
older darker understanding of the Christmas season as a time offering access to the spirit
world. Now in its second printing, The Krampus was described by LA Times’ books critic
Elizabeth as “gleefully erudite,” and a book that “deserves to become a classic.”
Ridenour is also a producer of Krampus events in Los Angeles, an artist and mask-maker,
and host of the folk-horror podcast, Bone and Sickle.

Home

https://www.boneandsickle.com/

Joining Al for more Krampus related fun and frolics will be Whitby’s very own Elaine Edmunds and Laurence Mitchell of Decadent Drawing, organisers of the annual Whitby Krampus run that takes place each December, and raises much needed funds for The Whitby Wildlife Sanctuary.

https://www.decadentdrawing.com/

 

38283177166_f0a848f150_o

We don’t want to say too much at this stage, but we can promise Al, Elaine and Laurence have something a little special planned for Winter Ghosts, and we can’t wait for you all to see it.

Our first musical addition to the lineup is the sensational Burd Ellen, the new solo project from Debbie Armour (Alasdair Roberts, Green Ribbons, Alex Rex) featuring Gayle Brogan (Pefkin, Barrett’s Dottled Beauty) and Lucy Duncan (Luki). The group uses traditional song to explore and evoke dark landscapes and deep stories. Innovative instrumentation, drone and sound-wash support detailed vocal work to create a unique sonic atmosphere.
Image result for burd ellen

Burd Ellen self-released their debut album SILVER CAME in Feb 2019, on limited edition CD. A record exploring women’s narratives in British folk song, SILVER CAME investigates ideas of persistence, defiance, devotion and transformation. The album was recorded by Jer Reid (Painted X-Ray, Claquer, Glasgow Improvisers Orchestra) over two days in the rehearsal space of Glasgow Theatre Arts Collective.

Burd_Ellen_groupshot_by_Maiken_Kildegaard_final.jpg

“sonically adventurous … with an emotional range and a raw inventiveness which is all too rare in contemporary folk circles.” – Alex Neilson
“A masterclass in shimmering, ethereal folk music… Cannot recommend highly enough” – Kyle Lonsdale, Earth Recordings

burdellen.com – burdellen.bandcamp.com
Sweet Lemany music video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSRB5Vsvx2A

Our final guest for this first announcement is George Cromack, a writer, sessional tutor and lecturer whose core subject areas are creative fiction, specifically Scriptwriting for film & T.V, and Film Studies. For almost ten years George taught on a number of programmes at the University of Hull’s Scarborough Campus – including modules on their Creative Writing Degree. It was during this time he developed his interest in what has become widely known as the Folk Horror genre, the subject of his film based PhD thesis, delivering a paper on some of its narrative conventions at the Fiend in the Furrows Conference in Belfast.  A keen advocate of adult and community education, George also teaches evening classes in Film Studies & Creative Writing for the local Scarborough branch of the WEA and introduces the occasional film screening at the Stephen Joseph Theatre. Recently one of his fictional short stories was included in Terrors Tales for a Winter’s Eve, a small collection of ghostly tales from local writers.

GeorgeCromackProfilePic

George’s talk ‘Home for the Holidays’ will take inspiration from adaptations of popular children’s stories in film and television such as The Children of Green Knowe, Moondial and the Amazing Mr Blunden examining their use of the ‘time slip’ narrative, notions of ‘ancestral mystery’ and speculating on their appeal.

Right that’s it for now, we’ve much more still to come, so please keep checking back for further announcements. Tickets are available from the link below priced at £13 for the full day and £7 for the evening. So what are you waiting for, grab your tickets now while stocks last.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/folk-horror-revival-presents-winter-ghosts-tickets-55468722442.ant

Image may contain: outdoor

An Interview With Sara Hannant

Folk Horror Revival is pleased to have put a few questions to accomplished photographer Sara Hannant …

https://i2.wp.com/www.sarahannant.com/wp-content/uploads/Mummers-Maypoles-and-Milkmaids.jpg?fit=685%2C828&ssl=1

Folk Horror Revival: Hi Sara, thank you for agreeing to be interviewed. Firstly, could you tell our readers a little about yourself, your inspirations and how you came to become a photographer?

Sara Hannant: Photographs can transport you to other times and places.  That capacity for reverie and storytelling has always fascinated me.  When I first started making pictures, I wanted to tell stories about people or experiences that I felt had previously been misrepresented.  I initiated collaborative portraiture projects so that the people I photographed actively contributed to making the image.  While I was an art student at Dartington College of Arts, I worked with Gypsies and Travellers to portray their daily life, which was very different from how they were shown in the local press.  The exhibition Pictures of Ourselves was shown at Plymouth Arts Centre alongside Gypsies by the Magnum photographer Joseph Koudelka.  Seeing the emotional power of Koudelka’s work prompted me to study documentary photography at Newport College of Art.  After completing the course, I worked as a professional photographer for national papers and magazines, and charities in the UK and abroad, mainly on commissions about social issues.  Through experimental approaches, I continue to investigate how the photographic image can alter the perception and reception of subjects that are misunderstood or overlooked.

https://i0.wp.com/www.sarahannant.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Abbots-Bromley-Horn-Dancers-performing-on-a-local-farm-Staffordshire1.jpg

Abbots Bromley Horn Dancers, Staffordshire

FHR: Your book Mummers, Maypoles and Milkmaids: A Journey Through the Ritual Year is a thorough and intriguing photo essay of traditional / contemporary English festivals and ceremonies. How did this book arise and were there any rites and rituals that particularly struck a personal chord with you?

SH: Mummers, Maypoles and Milkmaids: A Journey Through the Ritual Year started with a chance encounter in 2006 with Deptford Jack in the Green.  This discovery instigated my country-wide search for similar seasonal rites occurring through the wheel of the year.  I became interested in rituals which claim an ancient origin as well as those which are re-imagined or re-invented.  I am particularly fond of the fire festivals which light up the dark midwinter nights such as those at Ottery St Mary, Allendale and Lewes.  I also love the way the summer is welcomed in with performances of the Hal-an-tow in Helston Cornwall.  I aimed to capture the excitement and mystery of seasonal rites while celebrating the enduring social relevance of these popular customs for rural and urban communities.  I am delighted that Merrell published the book and the Horniman Museum showed the exhibition for nearly a year and subsequently toured the show.  It is the first British ethnographic exhibition that the museum has shown and the first to normalise representations of Paganism as part of English society.

https://i2.wp.com/www.sarahannant.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Burning-effigy-of-David-Cameron-with-Nick-Clegg-as-his-puppet-Cliffe-Bonfire-Society-Lewes-Sussex.jpg

Burning effigies of David Cameron and Nick Clegg, Cliffe Bonfire Society, Lewes, Sussex

FHR: Are there any other festivals or rituals from anywhere around the world you would especially like to capture and perhaps produce a book upon?

SH: Before Mummers, Maypoles and Milkmaids: A Journey Through the Ritual Year, I had documented community festivals in Mexico, India and Prague and felt it was time to explore the rich folklore closer to home.  There are many more contemporary British folkloric practices I would like to photograph.  I had thought of extending Mummers, Maypoles and Milkmaids: A Journey Through the Ritual Year to produce subsequent books that explore seasonal rites in the rest of the UK and I have made a start on this.

https://i1.wp.com/www.sarahannant.com/wp-content/uploads/Baphomet.jpg?fit=1200%2C1200&ssl=1

Baphomet, Museum of Witchcraft and Magic

FHR: Another of your books Of Shadows captures One Hundred Objects from the Museum of Witchcraft and Magic contains some very beguiling objects and artefacts; which are your personal favourite pieces from the collection and were there any objects that gave you the creeps or otherwise gave you a particular feeling whilst in their presence?

SH: Yes, the museum is full of enchanted objects some of which appear to have an intense presence, especially at night.  However, all of the artefacts in the museum have a resonance whether it’s because of their original magical use, the intentions bound into their making or the undeniable materiality of magical belief.  There were times when this potency felt palpable, particularly with objects once used in rituals or to represent ritual practice such as Baphomet/Old Horny.  The objects made to harness natural or spirit forces were captivating and often embodied ancient knowledge.  One of my favourite pieces is an example of the knot magic used by local witches when ‘Selling the wind’ to sailors.  The implements of torture used during the Witch Trials gave me the creeps!

https://i1.wp.com/www.sarahannant.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Skull-used-for-Ritual-Magic.jpg?fit=1200%2C1200&ssl=1

Skull used for Ritual Magic, Museum of Witchcraft and Magic

FHR: The format and style taken in Of Shadows is very effective. It gives the items a presence as if their portraits and biographies are granted rather than simply catalogued. Are there any other museum or gallery collections you would like to similarly present?

SH: Thank you, I felt privileged to engage with the magical objects and their hidden histories.  Several collections fascinate me including those at the Horniman, Petrie and Cuming Museums.  Once objects are removed from their original context, it is a challenge to rekindle some of their original properties.  I enjoy responding to those traces of energy which remain in the material.

https://i2.wp.com/www.sarahannant.com/wp-content/uploads/Rapunzel-1.jpg?fit=600%2C895&ssl=1

Rapunzel

FHR:  On your website you have some other beautiful and bewitching albums. Numinous is very well named as the images have a certain unearthly, spiritual allure whilst Ladybird, ladybird and Cinderella: Your House is on Fire combine nostalgia with the somewhat sinister and visually seductive encroachment of flames. Could you tell us more about the inspiration behind these images?

SH: Both of these projects reveal the process by which one thing, through intention, becomes another.  Numinous is inspired by healing rituals at sacred wells in Cornwall.  The images are deliberately ambiguous and explore magical belief and transformation.  In folklore, a strip of cloth or ‘cloutie’ is torn from a person’s garment, dipped into the well then hung on a nearby tree.  As it falls to the earth and rots, it is believed the illness will disappear. The cloths are said to connect to the divine power or spirits thought to inhabit the sacred place. Unfortunately, some people leave fabrics that will not biodegrade, and the Cornish Ancient Sites Protection Network consequently removes the offerings.  I have re-animated these discarded cloths using natural forces in keeping with the folk magic, symbolised by the classical elements.

Cinderella: Your House is on Fire and Ladybird, ladybird question the agency of the persecuted heroine in fairy tales.  On rediscovering my childhood copy of Cinderella, I felt compelled to revise the stereotyped images of the female protagonist to tell a different story.  Fire—a symbol of hearth and home, destruction, trial, purging, and purification seemed like the ideal agent for change.  As the pages burn, images and text are revealed or juxtaposed, re-visioning old stereotypes to enable new ideas and narratives.

https://i1.wp.com/www.sarahannant.com/wp-content/uploads/What-are-you-crying-for-3.jpg?fit=597%2C895&ssl=1

Remembering

FHR: Finally, could you tell us any other photographers and artists whose work inspires or speaks to you? Also, what are you currently working on and what projects do you have planned or are considering for the future?

SH: I admire many photographers and artists from a variety of genres.  Research into other disciplines such as history, folklore and magic also inform and inspire my practice.  I am currently working on a book Touching Witchcraft and Sorcery with the folklorist Jeremy Harte.  We have gone into the archives, into the forgotten places, to catch stories of witchcraft in tale and image.  My work is included in two upcoming exhibitions at Gallery Valid Foto in Madrid from May 8-25th Women Photographer’s Now: 12th Julia Margaret Cameron Award and the 12th Pollux Award.  In July, I will be showing a Moon inspired exhibition at Charlton House in London as part of the Moon Festival which coincides with the 50th anniversary of the Moon Landing.

https://i2.wp.com/www.sarahannant.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/The-Fool-Abbots-Bromley-Horn-Dance-Staffordshire1.jpg

The Fool, Abbots Bromley Horn Dance, Staffordshire

All Photography © Sara Hannant
https://www.sarahannant.com/

https://www.sarahannant.com/book/

Folklore Thursday: The Rye Wolf & The Tit Wife … and Other Tastes of Ergot

https://scontent.fman2-2.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/36618915_469375493485115_4234221799711178752_n.jpg?_nc_cat=104&_nc_ht=scontent.fman2-2.fna&oh=fa34ff851534efc83d0c2679dc40749b&oe=5CBCF1A2

Ergot (Claviceps purpurea) is a fungal parasite of grasses and cereal crops, particularly Rye, which if cooked and ingested, generally as bread, can cause wild symptoms including the sensation of burning of the limbs, gangrene necrosis of the flesh, intense hallucinations, miscarriage in pregnant women, and in the extreme, a horrific painful death.

Ergotism is sometimes known as Holy Fire or Saint Anthony’s Fire, named after the hermitic Desert Father Saint Anthony of Egypt, renowned for the visions of seduction and terror that he endured whilst in the solitude of devotion. The monks of the Order of St Anthony were said to be very skilled in dealing with Ergotism victims.

Convulsive Ergotism due to its profound symptoms and hallucinatory influence, has also been suggested as the possible cause of several outbreaks of Werewolf and Witch Hysteria in Europe, including the instance of Elfdale and Mora in 17th Century Sweden, whereupon a number of people were executed upon the testimony of children. The English Anglian Witch-hunts and also the infamous Witch-trial of Salem in 1692 have also been suggested as possible cases of Ergot infestation. Regarding the latter it was said that the New England founding fathers reputedly preferred bread made from Rye rather than the native Maize (which does not become infected by Ergot).

In Germanic and East European lore, Ergot is associated with the Crone-goddess, Roggenmutter ~ the Rye Mother. (Known also as the Iron Woman, Rugia Boba and the Tit-Wife, there has been comparison drawn to Baba Yaga, the witch of numerous Russian folktales). It is said that
the Rye Mother will lure children to the grain fields and suckle them upon her iron, Ergotamine-tainted nipples, causing them to become wild and insane.

Ergot and the Rye was also associated with wolves and included amongst the many colloquial names for Ergot are Roggenwulf (Rye Wolf), Wulfzahn (Wolf’s tooth) and Roggunhund (Rye Dog). An old Germanic saying states “The werewolf sits amid the grain.” It may be a cruel coincidence that in the harshest weather where the poor may have had no choice but to eat tainted bread (Ergot infestation also causes a considered drop in yield) were also the same conditions which may have forced starving wolves to enter the towns and villages.

https://scontent.fman2-2.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/36659267_469377850151546_6280245624256331776_n.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_ht=scontent.fman2-2.fna&oh=c8256d2a81a6cdfcb343979c9ba94928&oe=5CCA699A

It has suggested that the name of the mythical Anglo-Saxon hero, Beowulf, translates as ‘Barley Wolf’. He is of course remembered for his battles against woeful otherworldly monsters.

Though apparent accounts of Ergotism date back to 857AD and there is theory that the ancient Greeks and Mesopotamians were well aware of the properties of the unassuming smut on grass and folklore had drawn the association between the tainted cereal and the malady, science started to draw the link between fungus and symptoms in the 18th Century, and it wasn’t until the 20th Century that proper research was conducted upon Ergot. Whilst synthesising Ergot alkaloids in 1943, chemist Albert Hoffman accidentally absorbed traces of the active chemical d-lysergic diethylamide into his skin. His cycle ride home from work was far from the usual and upon that day LSD was born into the world.

Though scientific and agricultural practice have sought efficient measures to counter the problems of Ergot, Ergotism outbreaks are not impossible in the modern world. In 1951 in Pont St Esprit in France, 6 people died and 130 were hospitalised (many describing being attacked by wild animals as they were admitted) following the consumption of ergot-tainted bread.

https://scontent.fman2-2.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/386530_10150432213746952_834503795_n.jpg?_nc_cat=101&_nc_ht=scontent.fman2-2.fna&oh=2633d599a8421dfa87a0792f263ec26d&oe=5CCC013D

Text and images © Andy Paciorek