Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Fifth Reveal)

bm-banner4The first Folk Horror Revival event will be taking place at the British Museum, London on  October 16th 2016, featuring talks, lectures, short films, poetry readings, museum tours and other wyrd and intriguing happenings.

Cult television programmes and films of the 1960s and 70s are inspiring a new generation of poets, writers, artists and musicians with their atmospheric themes of contemporary individuals interacting with a uniquely British world of ancient mythology and magic, often uncanny and unsettling.

This special event will feature lectures, film screenings, performances and gallery tours of featured objects in the Museum’s collection to explore themes of cultural rituals, earth mysteries, psychogeography and folklore. Come along and prepare to be scared!

Ticket details to be announced very shortly.

We are proud to reveal other additions to the line up – see also

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (First Reveal)

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Second Reveal)

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Third Reveal)
Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Fourth Reveal)


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Bob Beagrie (b. 1967) is an award winning poet, playwright, and senior lecturer in creative writing at Teesside University. He has published six collections of poetry, including Huginn & Munnin (Biscuit Publishing 2002), Yoik (Cinnamon Press 2008), The Seer Sung Husband (an epic poem about Old Mother Shipton, Smokestack 2010) and SAMPO: Heading Further North (co-written with Andy Willoughby, Red Squirrel Press 2015). His poetry has been translated into Urdu, Dutch, Estonian, Finnish, Russian, Danish, Spanish, and Swedish. He is a founding member of the experimental spoken word and poetry collective Project Lono – https://soundcloud.com/projectlono-1 and co director of Ek Zuban Press and Literature Development.

Leasungspell is an epic poem, published by Smokestack Books in February 2016 and is an exploration of North East’s early heritage. It relates the story of an Anglo Saxon monk in 657AD as he travels across the wild and volatile landscape from the monastery on the Hartlepool Headland to Whitby, carrying secret letters from St Hild. On route he describes the route and reasons for travelling, but as with all epics, it is full of digressions and diversions, stories within stories, including an array of myths, folklore and local legends. The work is fictional but based heavily upon historical research and written in a hybrid of Old English, Modern English and Northern Dialect Forms.

Please see http://smokestack-books.co.uk/book.php?book=114

A few quotes of recommendation on the text –
“Here’s a fool’s tale you can trust – a powerful and surprising one. Set out if you will intrepidly with Oswin on the road from Hartlepool to Whitby, dark and dangerous as it was in the year 657. You’ll not be ultimately lost. The world of Leasungspell, envisioned here, gives back to us our own – with all its metaphysical, political and psychological complexity intact. Expect to stumble, though – intrigued, delightedly entangled in the ancient roots of English by the way.”
– Gillian Allnutt

“Leasungspell is a work of sustained visionary imagination the like of which is rarely encountered in contemporary English poetry. Beagrie’s heteroglossic rhapsody (written in an entirely new idiom, a scintillating combination of Old English, modern English and northern dialect forms) is a psycho-geographical paean to the landscapes, languages and peoples of his native Teesside – his temenos and omphalos. The language rings like the clashing of broadswords – this poem must be read out loud – and from that energy and violence, a vivid new world, at once both archaic and strangely contemporary, emerges.”
– Steve Ely

“Astonishing, haunting, ambitious in scale and impressive in reach, Leasungspell is a feast for the imagination.”
– Pippa Little

This live performance of Leasungspell was developed with support from Arts Council England, allowing Beagrie to work with a group of specialist musicians to develop the whole text into an online spoken word audio book with accompanying music and sound effects, and to develop an abridged version for live performance. The musicians are Sara Dennis (folk singer), Peter Lagan (Lutenist), Kev Howard percussion, Dordeseal (Celtic Horn) and throat singing, Stewart Forth percussion and sound effects.

The audio work is available to listen to in its entirety via www.leasungspell.com . The work consists of 8 parts / chapters and lasts 2 hours 30 minutes.


More speakers and ticket details to be revealed soon. Follow us on Facebook

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Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Fourth Reveal)

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The first Folk Horror Revival event will be taking place at the British Museum, London on  October 16th 2016, featuring talks, lectures, short films, poetry readings, museum tours and other wyrd and intriguing happenings.

Cult television programmes and films of the 1960s and 70s are inspiring a new generation of poets, writers, artists and musicians with their atmospheric themes of contemporary individuals interacting with a uniquely British world of ancient mythology and magic, often uncanny and unsettling.

This special event will feature lectures, film screenings, performances and gallery tours of featured objects in the Museum’s collection to explore themes of cultural rituals, earth mysteries, psychogeography and folklore. Come along and prepare to be scared!

Ticket details to be announced very shortly.

We are proud to reveal other additions to the line up – see also

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (First Reveal)

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Second Reveal)

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Third Reveal)

Kicking the event off will be two of our very own revivalist administrators presenting an introduction to Folk Horror; attempting to explaining it’s traits and perimeters. If you were going to challenge two people to this almost impossible task then you could do no better than recruiting Andy Paciorek and Darren Charles – which is exactly what the recent Alchemical Landscape event at Cambridge University did and we could think of no better way to start the very first FHR event than to request a repeat performance.

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Andy Paciorek is an artist and writer drawn mainly to the worlds of myth, folklore, symbolism, decadence, curiosa, anomaly, dark romanticism and otherworldly experience, and is fascinated both by the beautiful and the grotesque and by the twilight threshold consciousness where these boundaries blur. The mist-gates, edges and liminal zones where nature borders supernature and daydreams and nightmares cross paths are of great inspiration.
His solo books, Strange Lands: A Field Guide to the Celtic Otherworld and The Human Chimaera: Sideshow Prodigies and Other Exceptional People are to be followed by Black Earth: A Field Guide to the Slavic Otherworld.
He has produced art work for numerous projects such as Harper Collins’ Element Encyclopedia and Art for Mindfulness series, Cumbrian Cthulhu and has worked on books by several notable writers including Dr Bob Curran, John and Caitlin Matthews, Chris Lambert and Dr Karl Shuker.

He is the creator of Folk Horror Revival project and Wyrd Harvest Press, Folk Horror Revival’s publishing arm All of the books produced by this press charitably donate 100% of sales profits to The Wildlife Trusts.


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Darren Charles has been an administrator for the FHR group since its very inception and, like Andy with his books and art, has been very involved in all things Folk Horror for a long time before then. As part of The Dead End Street Band he was responsible for producing some fantastically gloomy, obsessive drones mixed with all manner of field recordings, electronics and pedal abuse. Darren was also central to setting up the Unearthing Forgotten Horror events in Newcastle where cult horror films were mixed with live performances including those by Darren himself with both The Dead End Street Band and his current noise outfit Equestrian Vortex.

Off the back of the success of these events Darren created the Unearthing Forgotten Horrors radio shows which cover obscure horror soundtracks, dark drones, weird electronica, crazed kosmiche and twisted psychedelia all of which is beautifully put together by Darren and his amazing knowledge of these music genres.


More speakers and ticket details to be revealed soon. Follow us on Facebook

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Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Third Reveal)

BM banner3.jpg

The first Folk Horror Revival event will be taking place at the British Museum, London on  October 16th 2016, featuring talks, lectures, short films, poetry readings, museum tours and other wyrd and intriguing happenings.

Cult television programmes and films of the 1960s and 70s are inspiring a new generation of poets, writers, artists and musicians with their atmospheric themes of contemporary individuals interacting with a uniquely British world of ancient mythology and magic, often uncanny and unsettling.

This special event will feature lectures, film screenings, performances and gallery tours of featured objects in the Museum’s collection to explore themes of cultural rituals, earth mysteries, psychogeography and folklore. Come along and prepare to be scared!

Ticket details to be announced very shortly.

We are proud to reveal other additions to the line up – see also

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (First Reveal)

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Second Reveal)

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We have already announced filmmaker Adam Scovell as one of the wonderful guest speakers at the FHR event on 16th October so now it is time to reveal our second filmmaker to be screening and speaking about his work – Gary Parsons

Gary is an MA film graduate from Goldsmiths College London who specialises in short films. Utilizing both, elements of the surrealist genre and images of the occult, these films are both beautiful and at times disturbing.

We are very excited that Gary has chosen the event at the British Museum to premier his latest film – ‘Conjuration’. It is a film about magick being a neutral energy and it’s residue from ancient times that is there for people to draw on and includes a re-enactment of an Alex Sanders ritual.

thelemafilms.com

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Revealing the Master of Ceremonies.

To make sure the day proceeds as has been planned by the FHR cabal Chris Lambert will be taking on the role of Master of Puppets for the day – introducing each speaker as well as welcoming you all to the event and summing up at the end of the day. Please allow me to introduce Chris Lambert – Storyteller – Teacher – Traveller of Mist – Mythogeographer – Demiurge – Liar

Chris is the curator of the Black Meadow and its associated phenomena. He works closely with Kev Oyston as part of “The Soulless Party” to uncover the mysteries hidden within its dense mist.
He writes far too much. As well as the critically lauded Tales from the Black Meadow and Songs from the Black Meadow he has also had short stories published in The Ghastling, The Dead Files and Tales of the Damned. He has had four plays published and over 20 performed professionally including: The Simple Process of Alchemy, Loving Chopin and Ship of Fools. He occasionally dabbles with music too.
He is currently working with Folk Horror emperor Andy Paciorek on a new collection of short stories entitled Wyrd Kalendar and Christmas on the Black Meadow.
Starburst Magazine has this to say about Tales from the Black Meadow: “The stand out entries include “Beyond the Moor” a poem about a maiden accosted by a bandit who remains unafraid due to having been to the “beyond” of the title and returned. Also of note are “Children of the Black Meadow” where a bereaved mother resurrects her deceased kids as blackberry bramble homunculi; cyclical damnation tale “The Coal Man and the Creature” and the paranoia-inducing sucker punch “The Watcher From the Village” … this is a collection that strongly invites a second reading…”

blackmeadowtales.blogspot.co.uk

More speakers and ticket details to be revealed soon. Follow us on Facebook

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Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (Second Reveal)

BM banner2.jpg

The first Folk Horror Revival event will be taking place at the British Museum, London on  October 16th 2016, featuring talks, lectures, short films, poetry readings, museum tours and other wyrd and intriguing happenings.

Cult television programmes and films of the 1960s and 70s are inspiring a new generation of poets, writers, artists and musicians with their atmospheric themes of contemporary individuals interacting with a uniquely British world of ancient mythology and magic, often uncanny and unsettling.

This special event will feature lectures, film screenings, performances and gallery tours of featured objects in the Museum’s collection to explore themes of cultural rituals, earth mysteries, psychogeography and folklore. Come along and prepare to be scared!

Ticket details to be announced very shortly.

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We are proud to reveal other additions to the line up – see also

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (First Reveal)

Eamon Byers completed his PhD at Queen’s University Belfast in 2014. His thesis explored the interaction between medievalism and folk music in English culture from the eighteenth century to the present day. Also in 2014, he co-organised ‘A Fiend in the Furrows: Perspectives on ‘Folk Horror’ in Literature, Film & Music’, the first conference dedicated to the academic study of folk horror.
He currently teaches English at Marymount International School London and continues to research and publish on the interactions between folk culture and medievalism in music, literature and politics.

The title of Eamon’s talk is: ‘The Ghost of Song: Folkmusic in the 21st Century’ where he will be looking at the influence of folk horror on contemporary folk, breaking down some hauntological examples and discussing sampling and the theoretical aspects of tradition and ancestry that goes along with modern folk.

Follow him on Twitter at – https://twitter.com/folkoff

 

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In addition to speakers and other live performers we will also be screening some short films by talnted film makers. The first of the filmmakers to be revealed is Adam Scovell.

Adam is a writer and filmmaker currently based between Liverpool and London He has produced film and art criticism for over twenty publications including The Times and The Guardian, runs the Celluloid Wicker Man website and has had work screened at FACT, The Everyman Playhouse, Hackney Picturehouse and Manchester Art Gallery.
Adam is the creator of the intriguing and impressive blog Celluloid Wicker Man

The title of Adam’s talk is Analogue Hauntings – The Ghost In The Grain
Why do ghosts manifest so effectively through analogue technology? Whether through tapes made of stone, through signal mechanisms on old Dickensian railway stations or through alchemically enhanced binoculars, ghosts have a tendency to achieve corporeality most powerfully in fictional media through pre-digital technologies. In this mixture of presentation and screenings, this phenomena will be examined within the contexts of hauntology, Nigel Kneale, M.R. James and filmic practice on super-8 celluloid.

Screenings :
• Salthouse Marshes (2015) (7:16) – Super-8 ghost stories inspired by Algernon Blackwood’s The Willows.

• No Diggin’ Here (2016) (3:07) – Super-8 essay film looking at Aldeburgh in the context of M.R. James’ A Warning To The Curious with a specially composed score by Laura Cannell. (Preview screening)

 

More speakers and ticket details to be revealed soon. Follow us on Facebook

2

Folk Horror Revival: British Museum Otherworldly (First Reveal)

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The first Folk Horror Revival event will be taking place at the British Museum, London on  October 16th 2016, featuring talks, lectures, short films, poetry readings, museum tours and other wyrd and intriguing happenings.

Cult television programmes and films of the 1960s and 70s are inspiring a new generation of poets, writers, artists and musicians with their atmospheric themes of contemporary individuals interacting with a uniquely British world of ancient mythology and magic, often uncanny and unsettling.

This special event will feature lectures, film screenings, performances and gallery tours of featured objects in the Museum’s collection to explore themes of cultural rituals, earth mysteries, psychogeography and folklore. Come along and prepare to be scared!

Ticket details to be announced very shortly.

We can proudly announce that one of the guest speakers will be Gary Lachman.

Gary is an American writer and musician. he is best known to readers of mysticism and the occult from the numerous articles and books he has published – Turn Off Your Mind: The Mystic Sixties and The Dark Side Of The Age of Aquarius (2002), The Dedalus Book of the Occult: A Dark Muse (2004), The Quest For Hermes Trismegistus From Ancient Egypt to the Modern World (2011), Revolutionaries of the Soul: Reflections on Magicians, Philosophers, and Occultists (2014) – He is additionally known to music fans as Gary Valentine one of the founders, and bassist of alternative rock/new wave band Blondie.

Gary will be presenting on Colin Wilson and the Angry Young Outsiders.

Before bursting on the London literary scene with the overnight success of his first book The Outsider in 1956, Colin Wilson spent some months sleeping rough on Hampstead Heath while writing his first no0gvel, Ritual in the Dark by day in the old Reading Room of the British Museum. Wilson was caught up in the media craze around the Angry Young Men, and he suffered from it, when the critics turned on the Angries and Wilson in particular. With a few exceptions, like his 1971 ‘comeback’ book The Occult, for most of his long career, Wilson remained an Outsider, ignored by the cultural establishment, while writing book after book. He died in 2013 at the age of 82. Gary’s talk will be based on his biography of Wilson, Beyond the Robot: The Life and Work of Colin Wilson, which, like a new edition of The Outsider to which he has contributed a new foreword, is published to commemorate the sixtieth anniversary of The Outsider’s first publication.

A tribute to Colin Wilson and An Interview with Gary Lachman features in the book        Folk Horror Revival: Field Studies


Also appearing will be Michael Somerset and his new ensemble The Consumptives. Michael is a former member of Clock DVA, has collaborated with Was (Not Was) and I Monster.

He is currently a freelance writer published by BMG and has written a series of short stories and poems accompanied by music and read by Reece Shearsmith, Bat For Lashes, Barry Adamson and numerous other impressive souls.

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FHR are proud to announce that The Consumptives (Michael Somerset’s new Gothic Orchestra) will be gracing us with their presence on the 16th. Performing macabre tales set to music (suitable for children and adults), Sylwia D Kittyfly,  Jules Lawrence,  Ozlem Simsek and Michael Somerset will guide us through a labyrinth of supernatural tales accompanied by singing and classic horror soundtrack instruments including theremin and saw.

A selection of Michael’s poetry features in the book Folk Horror Revival: Corpse Roads

More speakers and ticket details to be revealed soon. Follow us on Facebook

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The British Museum beckons …

Sunday 16th October sees the first ever Folk Horror Revival event and it is taking place in the UK’s most visited tourist attraction – The British Museum.
From 10:30 -5:00 there will be an array of speakers, film screenings, poetry, gallery tours and story telling.

There are also several other events in London scheduled to tie in with this exciting occasion over the weekend.
Mark the date in your diaries – full details will be revealed shortly.
It promises to be rather splendid indeed *;) winking